James Findlay

Online Studies Make Dreams Come True For Two Community Broadcasters

CBAA News, 15th February 2017
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James Findlay and Adrian McEniery will soon be graduates from the AFTRS 100% online Radio Content and Program Director’s Course, but they are already reaping the benefits of the learning combined with years of their own hard work and determination. Both have secured great new jobs – James at Triple J and Adrian at 3MBS Melbourne.

James was, until recently, the Program Director at Melbourne’s JOY 94.9 and he is now Sydney bound and set to start working on Triple J’s Sunday night sexed show The Hook Up. For James this is the culmination of years of related work.

“To say I’m excited about starting as Producer of The Hook Up is an understatement. It really is a dream come true, and I’m really looking forward to working with such a talented team at Triple J, and getting listeners educated on some filth,” he said.

Studying this year has been part of the journey for James.

“You can always learn more,” he said. “Even if you’ve been in radio for years or even decades, you can still learn something new”. Adrian McEniery

AFTRS lecturers come from industry and have a wealth of knowledge and experience from across the sectors. AFTRS Program Leader Radio Lisa Sweeney believes the real strength of the AFTRS experience is exposure to almost 100 guest lecturers from industry. “The intensity of the learning experience means the students can’t help but be industry ready,” she said.

James says he found the insights from industry professionals invaluable. “Having leaders like the Australian Radio Network’s Duncan Campbell and former Southern Cross Austereo Content Director Craig Bruce speak to you and give their expertise and advice is priceless,” he says.

James also believes the networking opportunities are pure gold. “It’s a small industry and the more people you know and can connect with, the better you’re supported and can support others.”

Churchill Fellow and Queensland Conservatorium graduate Adrian McEniery’s recent appointment to the role of Program Director at Melbourne’s fine music station 3MBS is testament to his passion for music and commitment to being at the top of his game in community broadcasting.

Adrian initially enrolled in the online AFTRS leadership course out of curiosity. “I wanted to know more about the business of radio and the concepts behind it, different principles of programming, how to build and engage teams across the station, conflict management, program improvement and management….all of it. It’s all interesting!” he said.

For Adrian, the Radio Content and Program Director’s Course has given him an invaluable insight into the industry. “As the course is very heavily focused on the commercial sector, it’s been fascinating to begin to understand how incredibly planned industry strategies are,” he said. “Coming from a community broadcaster and with not much background in the business of radio, this was a complete eye-opener”.

When asked if the experience at AFTRS was life changing, he said “Unexpectedly, and while it’s a cliché, yes, it has been for me.” AFTRS logo

Brought to you by AFTRS, a valued partner of the CBAA.

This article was first published in CBX Magazine in November 2016.

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Abstract
Recognising the historical partnership between the community broadcasting and higher education sectors, this paper reviews the pioneer educational program Talking to New England as collaboration between the University of New England and 2SER. It also documents the contributions to learning and teaching at Charles Sturt University (CSU) over three decades by 2MCE and evaluates the potential contributions of the station to the development of new teaching resources such as educational podcasting. This paper also outlines a pilot project at CSU established to investigate whether the “explaining voice” as a style of vocal presentation closely aligned to radio broadcasting traditions, could be adopted for university audio learning.