Community Broadcasting Foundation logo

#CBAAconf: Do's and Don'ts from CBF Grant Assessors

CBAA Communications, 30th January 2019
Print

At the 2018 CBAA Conference held back in November, our friends at the Community Broadcasting Foundation shared some of the most common feedback they hear from the people assessing grant applications.

CBF grant applications are open now, and close on 12 March 2019.

Could they be referring to your application? Take note!
  • This budget seems inflated! There is room in the budget for items to be reduced. This is not good value for money. You can pay so much less for that! Why do they need money to do that? That rate per hour for a wage is really high!
  • Evidence of support is lacking. Letters of support? It would have been helpful to hear about the project from other stakeholders.
  • Where are the quotes? I’m not convinced they’ve done their research…
  • How many hours of content are going to be produced?
  • This program is for Indigenous/Ethnic/Youth content but where are the Indigenous/Ethnic/young people involved?
  • I couldn’t access the demo! The demo was very bad audio quality. No demo included!
  • Where’s the community engagement/participation?
  • Could they seek funding for this project from elsewhere? E.g. sponsorship, fundraising or in-kind donation?
  • I want to see a more detailed breakdown of wages – e.g. number of hours & hourly rate
  • Not sure how this project meets the priorities for funding
  • This project seems ambitious and they haven’t convinced me they can deliver on it…
  • Project timeline not clear/lacking timeframe details. Specified time period is outside the funding period.
  • They’re asking for more than last year but they haven’t outlined why more money is needed?
  • The concept is not very original or creative
  • More robust planning is required
  • Performance measures are not tangible
  • Where are the latest financial statements?
Get more tips

Dean Linguey from the CBF Grants Support Team shared more information on preparing your best possible grant application at a CBAA webinar last week. Watch it below for more tips:

Sign up to the CBF update at www.cbf.org.au and follow the CBF on Facebook and Twitter.

Talk to the CBF Grants Support Team about your plans. Make sure you’re headed in the right direction before you get started. Call them on (03) 8341 5900.

Facebook comments

Related

Article

Abstract
The largest pressure faced by community radio stations is financial. Stations constantly face the reality of how to ensure an adequate operating income in an increasingly competitive mediascape. Van Vuuren (2006c) argues that the extent of the contribution of community media to media democracy in Australia depends largely on how the sector manages commercial pressures. There is a need to ensure more financial stability to allow stations to focus on their primary community-orientated and participatory goals.

Article

Abstract
The community radio sector is experiencing a time of rapid growth in Australia. While community broadcasting participants generally welcome the sector’s growth, they have expressed concern over the lack of proportionate funding increase from the Federal government. The key issue is the need to find ways to enhance community radio’s sources of funding without imperilling its status as a not-for-profit sector, and as one main option, the deregulation of sponsorship time presently limited to five minutes per hour may enhance income generation for community radio. This paper argues that there is no inherent conflict between entrepreneurial principles and not-for-profit principles.

Article

Abstract
This article is intended as a resource for community broadcasters and researchers. It draws on interviews and discussion with community broadcasters and activists to identify practical examples of funding methods. The seven common methods of funding a community station are detailed. These are: support from the station's own community; patronage from a larger organisation; commercial advertising and sponsorship; competitive grants; service contracts; support by NGOs; support by governmental agencies. The article points to resources where the reader can discover more fully how each funding method is used, and concludes that a prudent station may use several methods to help ensure economic sustainability.