Extras & Special Broadcasts

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Special Broadcasts

Throughout the year CRN brings stations a variety of live broadcasts including the Tamworth and Mildura Country Music Festivals, the Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras, International Women's Day content, Federal Budget coverage and much more.

Keep up to date with developments via the CRN Weekly Update emailed each Thursday.

About Extras

Extras 1 and Extras 2 are two program slots in the regular CRN Program Guide.

Extras 1 broadcasts between 13:04 - 14:00 EST/EDT; Extras 2 between 14:04 - 15:00 EST/EDT Wednesdays. Extras feature a variety of programs that change week to week. See below for details on the latest Extras programming.

If you missed this content in its broadcast week, contact crn@cbaa.org.au for a file download.

Upcoming Extras

Wednesday 23 August

Step Away From The Car (Radio Adelaide)

10 x 05'00 to 07'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Over a 10-part series of short pieces ready to drop into your radio programs, Step Away from the Car hears from a variety of thinkers who were present at the 2017 Australian Walking and Cycling Conference.

The conference and pieces get listeners thinking about using more 'active' choices when it comes to transport, choices that require stepping away from the car. 

Producer: Nikki Page, Radio Adelaide

Global Beats: Heavy Metal in Finland (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Heavy-metal music, with its distorted guitar sounds, emphatic rhythms and dense bass and drum is incredibly popular in Nordic countries. In Finland there are more heavy-metal musicians per capita than in any other nation on Earth, and the country seems to have a real love affair with this genre of music.

Finnish presenter Ida Kiljander takes us to Tuska, one of her country’s biggest metal festivals, to meet bands including Finland’s Moonsorrow, Sweden’s Bombus and the headlining French band Gojira.

Wednesday 15 August

National Indigenous Music Awards 2018 (TEABBA)

55'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 13:04 EST

On Saturday the Darwin Ampitheatre came alive for the 2018 NIMAs.

Catch performances from many award winners, finalists and hall-of-famers including Baker Boy, Busby Marou, Kasey Chambers, the Central Australian Aboriginal Women's Choir, Roger Knox and Alice Skye (pictured).

Wednesday 8 August

Communities in Control: Part 3 of 3 (SYN Media and Our Community)

27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Hear from some of Australia’s prominent public figures and community groups who lent their voices to the 2018 Communities in Control Conference, hosted by Our Community.

What does it take to combat inequality from the community level? What impacts are mental health issues and social fragmentation having on Australia as a society? How does difference act as a barrier for social integration? 

Hear Stan Grant and Hugh Mackay, plus Ann Burbrook from Illawarra Multicultural Services share their thoughts and insights. 

Producer: Caroline Tung

Winning It Big (BBC World Service)

26'30 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Most people have dreamed of winning the lottery. It’s a dream that has become ever more common around the world as jackpots get bigger and lotteries more numerous. But does money really make us happy, and how much does this depend on where we live and how we spend it?

To find out, the BBC’s Mike Thomson meets lottery winners from around the globe. Mike dines with Arab/Israeli restaurateur, Jawdat Ibrahim, who spends much of his $23 million windfall on trying to bring Palestinians and Israelis closer together, through good food and dialogue.

Past Extras

Wednesday 1 August

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 5 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode Five: Fatal Attraction

Historian Margaret MacMillan looks at representations of war: can we really create beauty from horror and death? Speaking at the Canadian War Museum, she discusses the paradox of commemoration. She questions attempts to capture the essence and meaning of war through art. The programme is presented by Anita Anand in front of an audience and includes a question and answer session.

Global Beats: New Labels (BBC World Service)

49'30 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions ofpotential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Wednesday 25 July

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 4 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode Four: Managing the Unmanageable

Historian Margaret MacMillan assesses how the law and international agreements have attempted to address conflict. Speaking to an audience at the Northern Irish Parliament Buildings at Stormont in Belfast, Professor MacMillan outlines how both states and the people have sought to justify warfare - from self-defence to civil war - focusing on examples from Irish and British history. 

Skateboarding is 60 (BBC World Service)

49'30 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Sixty years ago, a man wandered into a surf shop on the beach in Southern California with a homemade wooden board with four roller-skate wheels attached. An insignificant beginning for a culture that would eventually influence communities all around the world.

You might see the skateboard as just a toy, but in 60 years, the people who skate have created a culture that has had a profound influence across business, art, architecture, education and gender equality.

Wednesday 18 July

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 3 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode Three: Civilians and War

Historian Margaret MacMillan dissects the relationship between war and the civilian. Speaking to an audience in Beirut, she looks back at the city's violent past and discusses the impact of conflict on noncombatants throughout the centuries.

She explores how civilians have been deliberately targeted, used as slaves and why women are still often singled out in mass rapes. And she addresses the proposition that human beings are becoming less, not more violent. The programme is chaired by Anita Anand.

Beyond The Bars 2018: Part 2 of 2 (3CR)

55'50 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

On the air since 2002, Beyond the Bars in 2018 features stories, songs, opinions and poems from over 100 men and women in the Dame Phyllis Frost Centre, Barwon Prison, Fulham Correctional Centre, Marngoneet Correctional Centre, Loddon Prison and Port Phillip Prison. 

The all-black radio broadcast team present the broadcasts and workshops in the lead up to NAIDOC Week.

Wednesday 11 July

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 2 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode Two: Fearing and Loving - Making Sense of the Warrior

Historian Margaret MacMillan asks why both men and women go to war. "We are both fascinated and repulsed by war and those who fight," she says. In this lecture, recorded at York University, she explores looks at the role of the warrior in history and culture and analyses how warriors are produced.

And she interrogates the differences that gender plays in war. Anita Anand presents the programme recorded in front of an audience, including a question and answer session.

Beyond The Bars 2018: Part 1 of 2 (3CR)

55'50 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

On the air since 2002, Beyond the Bars in 2018 features stories, songs, opinions and poems from over 100 men and women in the Dame Phyllis Frost Centre, Barwon Prison, Fulham Correctional Centre, Marngoneet Correctional Centre, Loddon Prison and Port Phillip Prison.

The all-black radio broadcast team present the broadcasts and workshops in the lead up to NAIDOC Week.

Wednesday 4 July

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 1 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode One: War and Humanity

Speaking at the BBC’s Radio Theatre in London, Professor MacMillan begins by asking when wars first broke out.

Did they start with the appearance of homo sapiens? Or did they begin when human beings first organized themselves into larger groupings such as tribes, clans, or nations?

Adrian Sherwood's Dub Theory (BBC World Service)

49'30 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

British producer and founder of the On-U Sound record label, Adrian Sherwood, has been producing and remixing tracks over the last 30 years.

He has worked with artists as diverse as Public Image Limited, The Slits, The Fall, African Head Charge, Tackhead, Depeche Mode, Primal Scream, Sinead O'Connor and Asian Dub Foundation. Adrian’s career has epitomised the inter-racial journey of so much UK music, helping to inspire a uniquely British fusion of reggae, post-punk, industrial and electronica.

Hearing from his closest collaborators, we discover why Sherwood is such an important figure in UK music, and the continuing influence of his unique approach to production and mixing.

Wednesday 27 June

Communities in Control: Part 2 of 3 (SYN Media and Our Community)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

How are young people impacted by inequality? Can a strong community address issues affecting the youth in the future?

Jamila Rizvi and Paul Higgins shared their thoughts, live from the 2018 Communities in Control, hosted by Our Community. Jax Jacki Brown performs a spoken word piece on society’s attitude towards disabled and LGBTIQ people.

Producer: Stefan Bradley

This Way Out: Planet Pride 

55'50 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Seek out some of the distant - and not so distant - places where LGBTQ Pride events are making history. Hear how Pride is being celebrated and defended this year in places like Tunisia, Fiji, Lebanon, and Mike Pence’s hometown in the United States.

The highlight of this power-packed hour is coverage from Sydney, Australia of the 40th Anniversary Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras — starring the indomitable Cher - and the accompanying Koori Gras that put the spotlight on fabulous Aboriginal drag queen/activists and a Canadian 6 Nations lesbian singer/songwriter!

Wednesday 20 June

Communities in Control: Part 1 of 3 - Nicholas Gruen (SYN Media and Our Community)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Democracy is thought of as an inherently good system, which allows citizens to contribute to their society. Only, we know that democracy is in deep trouble across the world, so what went wrong?

Here to explain is Nicholas Gruen, speaking at the 2018 Communities in Control conference in Melbourne, hosted by social enterprise Our Community.

Producer: Nic Zoumboulis

Sound As Ever: Episodes 5/6 of 6 

2 x 27'50 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Explore stories and issues in the Australian music scene. Sound as Ever is a fresh series created by the Australian Music Vault, produced by young content producers and radio makers from Australian Music Vault Supporting Partner, SYN Media.

Episode 5: Hear Me Roar
Gender inequality in the music industry - how does it influences our work? Performers Miss Blanks and Lindy Morrison discuss what has changed and what has remained over the years. Hear Elspeth Scrine from the Listen collective, and broadcaster Tracee Hutchison.
Producers: Elsie Bath and Shejuti Hossain
Episode 6: Youth in the Australian Music Scene
What prevents young people from participating in the live music scene? Kate Duncan from The Push wants to revive underage gigs; teenage band New Slang talk about putting on successful all-ages gigs. How can the music industry be more inclusive of young people wanting the live music experience?
Producers: Rebecca Maakasa and Bridget Bourke

Wednesday 13 June

New Shoots Victoria: Episode 5 of 5 (Red Room Poetry)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

New Shoots Victoria is a Red Room Poetry radio series produced with the assistance of the Community Radio Network. 

Created by Red Room PoetryNew Shoots celebrates and cultivates poems inspired by plants and place to deepen cultural connections with nature.

Red Room Poetry, in partnership with Royal Botanical Gardens of Victoria and Australian Poetry commissioned 10 Victorian poets to create work in response to plants and spaces in the Gardens. The poets then read their work at a New Shoots Victoria event, held at the Gardens during the 2017 Melbourne Writers Festival. 

Episode 5: Elena Gomez and Autumn Royal

Title: 'We grew a little slower sometimes'

New Shoots Episode Five juxtaposes Elena Gomez’s succulent garden excavations with Autumn Royal’s wanderings in the camellia grove. Elena’s cryptic and imagined lives of plants on arid cliff-faces offer a kaleidoscopic contrast with Autumn’s camellia studies that carefully weave personal and taxonomic narratives.

The New Shoots radio series is produced by Prithvi Varatharajan. Music by Guillermo Batiz.

Sound As Ever: Episodes 3/4 of 6 

2 x 25'50 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Explore stories and issues in the Australian music scene. Sound as Ever is a fresh series created by the Australian Music Vault, produced by young content producers and radio makers from Australian Music Vault Supporting Partner, SYN Media.

Episode 3: Now That’s Punk
Beyond the mohawks, piercings and raucous guitars, punk, in Australia, is an attitude. It’s a feeling, present in the disruption and discontent of political discourse. We want to challenge definitions, biases and preconceived ideas about what ‘punk’ was, is and will look like in the near future. Our audience will leave with a new impression of what ‘punk’ can sound like and represent, and how this ethos exists in Australia’s contemporary music scene.
Producers: Erin Dick and Paul Waxman
Episode 4: Healing and community - mental health in the Music Industry
How music and mental health are intertwined? Artists, music industry workers and representatives from entertainment industry support organisations talk mental health issues in the industry. Hear about current initiatives and the next steps needed. Improve the conversation and care around artist and industry wellbeing, together with anecdotal experiences from musicians and support workers regarding these issues.
Producers: Erin Dick and Paul Waxman

Wednesday 6 June

New Shoots Victoria: Episode 4 of 5 (Red Room Poetry)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

New Shoots Victoria is a Red Room Poetry radio series produced with the assistance of the Community Radio Network. 

Created by Red Room PoetryNew Shoots celebrates and cultivates poems inspired by plants and place to deepen cultural connections with nature.

Red Room Poetry, in partnership with Royal Botanical Gardens of Victoria and Australian Poetry commissioned 10 Victorian poets to create work in response to plants and spaces in the Gardens. The poets then read their work at a New Shoots Victoria event, held at the Gardens during the 2017 Melbourne Writers Festival. 

Episode 4: Bonny Cassidy and Maria Takolander

Title: ‘Metaphor moves like spores’

Secrets of fungi and sacred trees fill New Shoots Episode Four with poets Bonny Cassidy and Maria Takolander. Inspired by a collection of Malcom Howie’s vivid watercolours at the Melbourne University Herbarium, Bonny paints poems that bring botanical specimens back to life, while Maria surveys the spiked, surreal and arid plants of Guilfoyle’s Volcano.  

The New Shoots radio series is produced by Prithvi Varatharajan. Music by Guillermo Batiz.

Sound As Ever: Episodes 1/2 of 6 

2 x 25'50 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Explore stories and issues in the Australian music scene. Sound as Ever is a fresh series created by the Australian Music Vault, produced by young content producers and radio makers from Australian Music Vault Supporting Partner, SYN Media.

Episode 1: A New Wave: Language and Genre Blending
Artists like Baker Boy and The Fifths are mixing genres and language with their personal histories. Their music is not only influencing the Australian music landscape in terms of creativity, but is having a positive influence over social and political issues.
Producers: Elsie Bath and Shejuti Hossain
Episode 2: Accessibility in the Australian Music Industry
Explore the barriers that prevent some music fans from enjoying a live show. How can issues of accessiblity be overcome? Chat to differently-abled music lovers,and hear from The Hackkets, a local band comprised of members with varying access needs.
Producers: Rebecca Maakasa and Bridget Bourke

Wednesday 30 May

New Shoots Victoria: Episode 3 of 5 (Red Room Poetry)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

New Shoots Victoria is a Red Room Poetry radio series produced with the assistance of the Community Radio Network. 

Created by Red Room PoetryNew Shoots celebrates and cultivates poems inspired by plants and place to deepen cultural connections with nature.

Red Room Poetry, in partnership with Royal Botanical Gardens of Victoria and Australian Poetry commissioned 10 Victorian poets to create work in response to plants and spaces in the Gardens. The poets then read their work at a New Shoots Victoria event, held at the Gardens during the 2017 Melbourne Writers Festival. 

Episode 3: Duncan Hose and Cameron Lowe

Title: ‘The petals are their own news’
New Shoots Episode Three explores Duncan Hose and Cameron Lowe’s humorous and critical observations of European botanical order and the fetishised lives of plants in the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria. Their poems and reflections question our manipulation and mythologisation of the Gardens and our life with these plants.  

The New Shoots radio series is produced by Prithvi Varatharajan. Music by Guillermo Batiz.

The World’s Marriage Story (BBC World Service)

49'30  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

While marriage rates are falling across Europe, in south Asia and China, marriage is near-universal. Are today’s weddings a one-to-one expression of romantic love? An explicit message to offspring already born?

A sign that cultural and religious orthodoxy is being adopted by today’s young? Or are marriages a desire to please parents and wider family?

Mary-Ann Ochota tries to answer such questions in Sweden where she talks to heterosexual and homosexual couples about why they decided to tie the knot, and to “sambos” - couples who decided they do not want to marry - about their choice.

Wednesday 23 May

New Shoots Victoria: Episode 2 of 5 (Red Room Poetry)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

New Shoots Victoria is a Red Room Poetry radio series produced with the assistance of the Community Radio Network. 

Created by Red Room PoetryNew Shoots celebrates and cultivates poems inspired by plants and place to deepen cultural connections with nature.

Red Room Poetry, in partnership with Royal Botanical Gardens of Victoria and Australian Poetry commissioned 10 Victorian poets to create work in response to plants and spaces in the Gardens. The poets then read their work at a New Shoots Victoria event, held at the Gardens during the 2017 Melbourne Writers Festival. 

Episode 2: Bruce Pascoe and Ryan Prehn

Title: ‘Old river red rooted neath the speargrass’

New Shoots poets Bruce Pascoe and Ryan Prehn unearth the pre-colonial history of the Gardens in Episode Two. Sharing the story of the wise philosopher Kuller Kullup, Bruce reveals the history of the man who prophesied the falling of the sky after meeting missionaries at the site of the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria. Ryan reconnects with remnant vegetation, weaving past with present through his encounters with biel, a 300-year-old remnant River Red Gum that has survived colonisation.

The New Shoots radio series is produced by Prithvi Varatharajan. Music by Guillermo Batiz.

Global Beats: Moscow (BBC World Service)

49'30  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Moscow, a city whose contemporary culture is all too often eclipsed by international politics. Presenter Jamie Coomarasamy, a former BBC Moscow Correspondentand long-time Russian music lover, steps away from diplomatic spats to hear from Moscow's new generation of musicians and songwriters.

He discovers which genres are thriving and why, and meets some of the most inventive exponents. Rap is hugely popular in Russia right now and one of the most interesting rappers is Mnogoznaal. He comes originally from the Komi Republic in the far north of the country, and speaks out in his lyrics about social problems including poverty and drug addiction amongst Komi's youth.

There’s also ambient electronica, punk-jazz, and a trip down the rabbit hole to the heart of Moscow's rave culture.

Wednesday 16 May

New Shoots Victoria: Episode 1 of 5 (Red Room Poetry)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

New Shoots Victoria is a Red Room Poetry radio series produced with the assistance of the Community Radio Network. 

Created by Red Room PoetryNew Shoots celebrates and cultivates poems inspired by plants and place to deepen cultural connections with nature.

Red Room Poetry, in partnership with Royal Botanical Gardens of Victoria and Australian Poetry commissioned 10 Victorian poets to create work in response to plants and spaces in the Gardens. The poets then read their work at a New Shoots Victoria event, held at the Gardens during the 2017 Melbourne Writers Festival. 

Episode 1: Carissa Lee Godwin and Chris Wallace-Crabbe

Title: ‘Dreaming of lands from before’

In Episode One, New Shoots poet Carissa Lee Godwin shares her experience of “otherness” and of finding affinity as a First Nations person in the arms of the Monterey Cypress. While long-time friend of the Garden, Chris Wallace-Crabbe reflects on the many ages and memories of youth mapped by the trees, ponds and plants he has grown up with. 

The New Shoots radio series is produced by Prithvi Varatharajan. Music by Guillermo Batiz.

Blind, Black and Blue (BBC World Service)

49'30  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

There were many real blind, black bluesman, scraping a living in the Deep South a hundred years ago.

From Blind Willie Johnson and Blind Lemon Jefferson on opposite street corners in Dallas to Blind Blake and Blind Boy Fuller in Georgia and the Carolinas, the early 20th century saw blind bluesmen playing everything from the lewd, raw blues of the juke joint to the God-fearing spirituals beloved of the new wave of Southern churches and with a musical legacy that's lasted through the decades.

How did this group of blind musicians, faced with all the disadvantages of race, segregation, disability and poverty, manage to achieve celebrity in their own day and leave such a lasting mark on the history of American music?

Please note the advertised Eurovision Song Contest special is still in production.

Wednesday 9 May

2NIM Nimbin's documentary seriesExposing the War on Drugs: Episode 7 & 8 (NIM FM)

2 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

From NIM FM Nimbin comes an 8 part documentary series looking at the West's 'War on Drugs', painting a different picture to one portrayed by the most media.

The Law on Drugs 
Delve into the paranoia and baseless laws that have been developed to support the
war on drugs.

Who Benefits?
So who benefits from this war? Meet the beneficiaries and clues to end it.

Read more here!

2018 Federal Budget analysis (2SER, ArtSound FM, CAAMA, Radio Adelaide)

Various short segments  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

This budget night, a consortium of community radio reporters will return to the 2018 Federal Budget Lockup.

Expect standalone packages focussing on key areas affecting our communities including Indigenous affairs, Welfare/Social Services, Education and Communications.   

Read more here.

Wednesday 2 May

2NIM Nimbin's documentary seriesExposing the War on Drugs: Episode 5 & 6 (NIM FM)

2 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

From NIM FM Nimbin comes an 8 part documentary series looking at the West's 'War on Drugs', painting a different picture to one portrayed by the most media.

Medicinal Cannabis in Oz Part 1 & 2

Medicinal cannabis and the reality behind the conservative hype in Australia that is affecting many lives.

Read more here!

Global Beats: Music for Film (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Global Beats explores the music that moves us when we watch the movies.

Tommy Pearson talks to a variety of composers and commentators about music for films, a musical form of storytelling.

Our experience of watching a film is as much shaped by the music as the words and images. The music creates an atmosphere, adds a special magical element to lift a scene, illuminates aspects of the story and cements our memories of the film as a whole.

Wednesday 25 April

2NIM Nimbin's documentary seriesExposing the War on Drugs: Episode 3 & 4 (NIM FM)

2 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

From NIM FM Nimbin comes an 8 part documentary series looking at the West's 'War on Drugs', painting a different picture to one portrayed by the most media.

Nimbin, Australia

The history of Nimbin, from dying dairy town to the third most popular tourist destination in New South Wales.

Nimbin in the News 

Where did Nimbin's politics come from? Hear how Nimbin has developed into an activist community and its misrepresention in mainstream media.

Read more here!

Veteran stories of Vietnam

4 x 11'00 to 12'00 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Short features portraying the experiences of Australian Veterans in Vietnam. 

Produced by Triple H 100.1FM's Neil Ashworth, over his decade in community radio Neil has frequently come into contact with “the deeply moving and powerful experiences most of our servicemen have been through”. 

Read more here.

Wednesday 18 April

2NIM Nimbin's documentary seriesExposing the War on Drugs: Episode 1 & 2 (NIM FM)

2 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

From NIM FM Nimbin comes an 8 part documentary series looking at the West's 'War on Drugs', painting a different picture to one portrayed by the most media.

How Did We Get Here?

The rise prohibition and the man behind it, Harry Anslinger, the first chief of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics in the US. 

A History of Cannibis 

The history of cannabis and the media hype around this herb.

Read more here!

Blak Diggers

10 x 01'00 to 02'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

While ANZAC Day is argued to be 'one that unifies us all' it’s fair to say that the story of the contribution of Australia’s First Nations people often goes untold.

New for 2018 from MediaHeads, Blak Diggers is a custom-built ANZAC Day Radio Series that honours Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander participation in the First and Second World Wars. 10 short episodes running from 1 to 2.5 minutes are presented by leading Aboriginal actor, personality and Arrente man Aaron Pederson.

See the cue sheet PDF iconhere.

Wednesday 11 April

Pink Floyd's Roger Waters on Music and Palestine (3CR)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Roger Waters is known both for his epic musicianship with Pink Floyd and also his support for Palestinian human rights.

While on his recent Australian concert tour he spoke about both topics and his experiences performing in Israel/Palestinian territories.

Hear him live in conversation with award-winning Palestinian-Australian author and activist Randa Abdel-Fattah and Jewish-Australian author and activist Antony Loewenstein.

The Policy Shop - Parts 3 & 4 (University of Melbourne)

51'00 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

The Policy Shop presents subjects with global and local experts, with every episode hosted by the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne.

This edition: Can Australia maintain its high standard of living in the face of declining productivity? with Chairman of the Productivity Commission, Peter Harris AO, and: By 2050, almost 70 per cent of the world’s population will live in cities. How can universities help urban populations thrive? with  Deborah Bull, Assistant Principal at King’s College London, Derek Douglas, Vice-President for Civic Engagement and External Affairs at the University of Chicago and Chief Executive Officer of the City of Melbourne, Ben Rimmer.

Wednesday 4 April

Yevgeny Murzin - Master of the Synthesiser (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

A celebration of the creator of an utterly unique piece of Russian musical history: the A.N.S. – one of the very first synthesizers in the world.

The invention of the A.N.S. by Yevgeny Murzin (1914 – 1970) was a huge advance in music technology and the culmination of decades of electronic musical innovation in Russia.

The Policy Shop - Parts 1 & 2 (University of Melbourne)

51'00 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

The Policy Shop presents subjects with global and local experts, with every episode hosted by the Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne.

This edition asks 'Does The Government Get The Right Advice' with Dr. Martin Parkinson, Secretary of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, and 'Why Can't We Cure Cancer?'.

Wednesday 28 March

Stephen Hawking: Infinite Wisdom (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Following the death of Professor Stephen Hawking, here is another chance to hear his 2016 BBC Reith Lectures on black holes. For many of us black holes are pretty mind-boggling - the stuff of science fictionnightmares. But Stephen Hawking said - rather than see them as menacing and destructive, we should try to understand them…. and thereby unlock the secrets of the Universe.

Global Questions: Beirut (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Unlike its regional neighbours, Lebanon appeared to be entering a period of political and economic stability. But tension is mounting as Saudi Arabia escalates its power struggle with Iran. As Iran continues toexert its influence and defend its interest across the region, there is growing concern about how the conflict might affect the stability of the fragile coalition in Lebanon and the impact on the wider Middle East.

Wednesday 21 March

Streets of Tamworth: Tamworth Aboriginal Cultural Showcase (Radio MAMA)

7 x 15'00 to 23'00 min segments  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT and Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Highlights from the Tamworth Country Music Festival 2018 Aboriginal Cultural Showcase. Expect performances from Lizzie Steadman, Roger Knox, Scott Darlow, Warren H Williams and may more.

There are 12 music segments and a promotion available in total. Contact CRN for more details.

Wednesday 14 March

Black, Bold and Beautiful (98.9fm)

55'25 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

For International Women's Day 2018, 98.9fm's Wild Black Women were live at Brisbane City Hall for the 10th annual Black, Bold and Beautiful event.

Hear speeches and panel discussions with current and future Indigenous leaders including Queensland Paralympian Torita Blake, Queensland's youngest Indigenous female pilot Tori Nikolaou, Christie Anderson, and Queensland's first Indigenous Newsreader on mainstream television,Rubena Colbey.

Jazzing Up Japan (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

As Japan emerged from World War Two, American occupation forces set out to remake Japanese society in their own image. They decided that popular music would play its part - especially jazz: democratic Americana in its purest form. Join Dr Chris Harding as he goes in search of the results of America’s grand plan for Japan. 

Wednesday 7 March

International Women's Day specials

2 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

How Do I Cope? (4EB)

Broadcaster behind 4EB's 'Women's Profile', Maureen Mopio, presents this documentary on mental health related issues amongst culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) adolescents and Non-English speaking women, girls and families.

This feature is funded by Queensland Government, is supported by YWCA Queensland and is produced by Maureen Mopio with 4EB.

#PRESSFORPROGRESS (4ZZZ)

Through a selection of engaging personal and discussion pieces, this International Women’s Day special will explore the current scope of gender equality and the progress that is being made or needs to be made in a range of fields.

Look at how members of our community are pressing for progress in their area, through the lens of female and non-binary folk.  

Read and hear more here.

International Women's Day specials

27'50 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Women in the Bearpit (Radio Adelaide)

Annie Hastwell examines the changing presence of women in broadcast current affairs. What's happened over the past few decades as women enter spaces to grill politicians and power figures? Is the increasing presence of women changing the news we see and hear?

Through interviews with high profile presenters past, present and future, look at the challenges – a blokey news culture, audience reaction to the ‘girl’ voice – and the potential for a equitable news culture. 

Read and hear more here.

Wednesday 28 February

Sonic Tonic - Parts 5 to 7

Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Part 5: There is no ‘them or us’. (24'30)

Your morning coffee is just a ritual. Your afternoon red wine when you get home from work is just a way to wind down. Jakeb Fair argues that we have to get away from the hurtful language and stigmatism and realise that all of us are one step away from becoming addicted to, well, almost anything.

Part 6: Unpacking the Lootbox. (24'30)

Over the years, as the video gaming industry has matured, the financiers and investors have looked for ways to increase their margins and their profits. But as Douglas Thompson finds out, 'loot boxes' require a small micropayment before the player can find out what they are getting into.

Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Part 7: Learning to Live. (22'10)

Death, like taxes, they say, is inevitable. Sarah Giles, who produced this featured, wanted to explore the impact the death of her grandad had on her and her family.

Wednesday 21 February

Sonic Tonic - Parts 1 to 4

Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Part 1: Do I have a problem with that? (24'00)

Australian’s spend a staggering 24 billion dollars a year on gambling. The average punter throws away, on average, 3.1 percent of their household income. Auden Hillman is one of the one in six gamblers who has a problem with their habit. 

Part 2: Game Over. (25'25)

Australian game development studios were once ranked among the world's best. But, as with all golden ages, it didn’t last. Donal Shiel finds that some designers and studio bosses were able to rebuild their careers but for many more, it was game over.

Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Part 3: Into the Studio with SUN. (22'30)

Rudie Dodd is the vocalist and keyboard player for Melbourne dream pop outfit, SUN. In this story, Rudie and the rest of the band invite us into their first professional studio recording session as they lay down their single “Baby”. 

Part 4: My Mum’s Dog Died. (24'30)

If you’ve ever owned a pet you know the heartbreak and stress that accompanies their death. While recording this, Alekszander Vujicic’s mum’s dog died. His recording of what happened next was unplanned, unscripted and done under extreme duress.

Wednesday 14 February

China's Generation Gap (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Chinese reporter Haining Liu travels to Beijing and finds out what it was like for people who grew up during the Cultural Revolution and how those who lived under strict communism relate to their children who have had much more material, individualistic lives.

And she hears about new attitudes to work and education as more people choose to study and work and outside the state system.

Koori Gras 

14'23 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Produced by Barry McKay for This Way Out, the international LGBT radio magazine.

The world famous Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras is more than just a parade and a party. There’s a lesbian and gay film festival, theatre, Fair Day, a Queer Thinking talk-fest, art exhibitions, street parties, and for indigenous LGBTIQ Australians, there are also some events on the calender such as Koori Gras.

In the third year Mardi Gras was held, 1980, the first documented participation of indigenous LGBTIQ Australians was a group marching under the banner BLACK GAYS. Since then indigenous participation in the Mardi Gras has grown. The main series of events this year comes under the heading of Koori Gras in the online Mardi Gras program. Barry Mckay looks at some of the events happening this year and gives us a taste of some of the performances from last year.

Wednesday 7 February

Pine Gap: The Secret U.S. Spy Base in Australia’s heart (2XX)

55'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

This is the story of six Peace Pilgrims who were arrested inside the top secret US spy base at Pine Gap near Alice Springs.

Research based on the Ed Snowden leaks shows that Joint Facility Defence Pine Gap is probably the CIA’s “most important technical intelligence collection station in the world”.

Walking by stealthily starlight through the night, the Peace Pilgrims covered 14 km to enter the Base through a 4 strand cattle fence. They carried with them musical instruments and a small amp. 

The Music of Time: Jamaica (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Dr Carolyn Cooper, from the University of West Indies, explores how Jamaican music has given a voice to resistance against oppression over many decades.

She tells a story starting with the Nyabinghi drumming of the years of slavery, through 1970s reggae, the dancehall sound of the 1980s and 1990s, right up to a modern day reggae revival. She hears how the sounds of this Caribbean island have shaped its people and politics, providing a rich commentary on the lives of Jamaicans.

Wednesday 31 January

Music of Time: India (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Jasdeep Singh explores the profound effects of Indian independence and partition on the music of north India.

On the 15 of August 1947, India gained its independence and was simultaneously divided by lines drawn through Punjab in the north-west and Bengal in the east, creating the brand new, Muslim-majority country of Pakistan.

As millions fled across these new borders - Muslims going from India to Pakistan, and Hindus and Sikhs coming the other way, this violent, destructive and traumatic partition also affected centuries of musical tradition.

2018 Golden Guitars: Interviews with the Award-winners

13 x 01'00 to 03'00 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Get close with each winner of the 2018 Golden Guitars behind the stage at the 31st Tamworth Country Music Festival.

Produced by the Good Morning Country team, these short interviews will fit perfectly into your stations local country music program.

Artists include Kasey Chambers, The McClymonts, Tom Curtin & Luke O'Shea, Lee Kernaghan, The Davidson Brothers and many more.

Wednesday 24 January

Happy & Healthy Hour: Men's Health (2NVR)

55'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

2NVR Nambucca Valley Radio's Michelle Smith looks closely at health and cancer for regional Australians.

Joined by the community's GP, Dr. Helene Johnson, a small team look at their impressions of men's health, mental wellbeing and cancer in their 'Happy & Healthy Hour'.

Global Beats: Senegal (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Senegal has produced some of Africa's most successful musicians - including Youssou Ndour, Baaba Maal, Ismael Lo, and Orchestra Baobab. But is this country still generating exceptional musical talent today?

Presenter Mayeni Jones travels to Dakar in Senegal to meet artists like Aida Samb, a young woman from a musical dynasty, who is breathing new life into the traditional Senegalese Mbalax sound, and Ibaaku, one of the country's few experimental electronic musicians and an influential figure in the Hip-Hop scene.

Wednesday 17 January

Pandemic (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Professor John Oxford, one of the world’s leading virologists, looks at how the 1918 and 1919 flu pandemic affected every corner of the world.

Over 50 million people died in the three outbreaks which hit between 1918 and 1919. It’s one of the most devastating pandemics in history and to this day scientists are still trying to pin point its origins in the hope of learning lessons for fighting such a catastrophe in the future.

More people died in the so called ‘Spanish Flu’ of 100 years ago, than perished in the First World War. It even killed more than the bubonic plague, yet in many parts of the world it’s virtually forgotten about.

Bella Bellow - Songbird of Togo (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Ata Ahli Ahelba offers listeners around the world the chance to discover Togo’s best-loved musician, Bella Bellow. He looks at her music and tells the extraordinary story of her life.

Although she died at the tender age of 27 in 1973 Bella Bellow continues to influence the country today along with musicians such as Angelique Kidjo. Togo’s Bella Bellow Choir is made up of 100 young women dedicated to keeping her songs alive. Bella Bellow’s voice is sublime, akin to the early Miriam Makeba.

Her talent was discovered when she was at school and at 21 she was invited to perform at the Festival of Black Arts (Festival Mondial des Arts Nègres, 1966) in Dakar, an event of great cultural significance, which made her a household name across West Africa, where she proceeded to go on tour. She also performed in Brazil and Paris.

Wednesday 10 January

The Jason Bartlett Story (Radio MAMA)

4 x 09'00 to 13'00 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

In 2017, the late Jason Bartlett recorded a wish to raise awareness of the importance of men taking personal responsibility for their health. The 36 year old singer, songwriter and former television music show star recorded the wish just days before he passed away in Royal Perth Hospital in June, from complications of diabetes and obesity, leading to heart and kidney failure.

Over 4 parts, hear Jason's story and advice to others.

Funded by the Western Australian Centre for Rural Health, produced by Health Communication Resources in association with Midwest Aboriginal Media Association.

Aretha at 75 (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Known as the Queen of Soul, voice artists have been in awe of Aretha Franklin for 50 years.

In Aretha at 75 Mark Coles talks to musicians, fans and producers from different parts of the world about what makes her so special.

Wednesday 3 January

Art for the Millions (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

In the middle of the greatest crisis it had faced since the Civil War, the American government looked to the arts to both help lift the national spirit and spread the message of the New Deal. That collectively the people could renew American democracy and create a better tomorrow. More practically it was an extension of Federal Relief for 40,000 unemployed actors, musicians, writers and artists across the nation.

On the government payroll and under the auspices of Federal One, a host of talents from Jackson Pollock to Arthur Miller, Orson Welles to Zora Neale Hurston helped democratise art; for the people, by the people with the people. 

Mugabe's Last Days (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

An extraordinary ten days as Robert Mugabe stepped down after four decades as president. When it comes to holding onto power few can match the record of the Zimbabwean politician.

He famously said, “I’llleave the presidency when God calls me.” In the end it was the army, the people and his own party that forced him out. It didn’t go as smoothly as they hoped.

Wednesday 27 December

The Music of Time - The Ottoman Empire (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Between 1895 and 1923, as the Ottoman Empire was unravelling, several hundred thousand Greeks, Armenians, Arabs, Jews and Turks emigrated to America, bringing their music with them. When war, expulsions and massacres tore their world apart, music helped them preserve their culture and their memories - and, in some cases, allowed them to make a living.

Maria Margaronis traces the story of those Ottoman musicians, and explores the mysterious power of their makam-based music, which binds together joy and sorrow, spiritual longing and sensual desire.

The CIA's Secret War in Laos (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Radio producer Peter Lang-Stanton thought his father was a paper-pushing bureaucrat in the State Department. Then one day, his father revealed his double- life as a spy.

Much of his father’s past was a lie; he never fought in the Vietnam War, as he said. Instead, he was involved in a covert mission in 1960s Laos under his codename: Pig-Pen. Through deep interviews with ex-CIA and a former Laotian soldier, Peter Lang-Stanton tells a story of lies and half-truths, of pride and regret.

Wednesday 20 December

Who Killed the Circus? (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

It began in 1871 as P.T. Barnum’s Grand Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan and Hippodrome. It survived the Depression and two world wars as well as rival entertainment such as film, television and radio.

But, in January this year, the world’s most historic circus, Ringling, Barnum and Bailey, announced it was closing, sending hundreds of circus performers looking for jobs.

Writer and former circus artiste, Dea Birkett, goes behind the scenes with the performers. She meets lion tamer Alexander Lacey and Ringmaster Johnathan Lee Iverson as they prepare for their final performance and begin to negotiate a new life away from the circus.

Global Beats: Iran (BBC World Service)

49'00 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Hear music from Iran, including composer and kamancheh player Kayhan Kahlor, one of the country's most talented performers and innovators when it comes to classical Persian music.

There is electronic artist Sote, who returned to Tehran five years ago and who has set up the cutting edge SET festival of electronic music in the Iranian capital.

Wednesday 13 December

Health, disability care and neo-liberal reform. (3CR)

27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Disability care, like health generally, is fast becoming yet another commodity with the roll-out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

The implications for the sector and its workers are far-reaching. Recordings from the Union Activism and History Conference, October 2017. Recorded on the lands of the Kulin Nation.

  • Guest:  Adam Bottomley
  • Presenter:  Helen Gwilliam
  • Recordings: Annie McLoughlin 

The Odyssey of General Anders Army (BBC World Service)

49'00 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Monica Whitlock tells the astonishing story of the exile and survival of 115,000 Polish men, women and children in World War II who formed the rag tag Anders Army.

This is one the last untold epics of World War II. A nation in exile, an army raised amidst the Siberian wilderness, a rag tag odyssey of men, women and children across Europe, and a famous battle ground to leave their mark.

Wednesday 6 December

Step Away From The Car (Radio Adelaide)

10 Parts x 7'00 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT and Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

The simple acts of walking and cycling have the potential to transform the places we live, our economies and how we engage with our environment.

Over a 10-part series of short pieces, Radio Adelaide's Nicky Page hears from a variety of thinkers who were present at the 2017 Australian Walking and Cycling Conference, encouraging more active choices in our transport. 

Read more here.

Wednesday 29 November

Common Ground (2SER/Guardian Australia)

Part 3 of 4 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

From 2SER and Guardian Australia, Lenore Taylor and Rebeca Huntley bring four very different Australians together to find out what they think of the political system. Read more.

Common Ground (2SER/Guardian Australia)

Part 4 of 4 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

From 2SER and Guardian Australia, Lenore Taylor and Rebeca Huntley bring four very different Australians together to find out what they think of the political system. Read more.

Wednesday 22 November

Common Ground (2SER/Guardian Australia)

Part 1 of 4 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

From 2SER and Guardian Australia, Lenore Taylor and Rebeca Huntley bring four very different Australians together to find out what they think of the political system. Read more.

Common Ground (2SER/Guardian Australia)

Part 2 of 4 x 27'50 mins  - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

From 2SER and Guardian Australia, Lenore Taylor and Rebeca Huntley bring four very different Australians together to find out what they think of the political system. Read more.

 

2NIM Nimbin's documentary series

An 8 part documentary series from NIM FM looking at the war on drugs in Australia and the rest of the world.

Through a 12 part series Shayne Locke looks at music that changed the world. 

Triple H 100.1FM presenter Neil Ashworth brings listeners a series on Australian Vietnam Veterans.

Pine Gap - sitting in the Australian desert - is likely the CIA’s “most important technical intelligence collection station in the world”.

CRN Segments Series

Flex your creative thinking, develop production skills, and share radio content on a national platform.

CBAA NFDS 2018

Check out the National Features and Documentary Series.

Ten short ideas encouraging active transport

Ten stories about cities and urban life

Outstanding special episodes of It's A Long Story and Deadly Voices From The House specials are distributing to community radio stations.

Community Radio Network Program Guide

A guide to the programs currently being broadcast/distributed via the CBAA's Community Radio Network (CRN) to community radio stations all over Australia.