Extras & Special Broadcasts

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Special Broadcasts

Throughout the year CRN brings stations a variety of live broadcasts including the Tamworth and Mildura Country Music Festivals, the Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras, International Women's Day content, Federal Budget coverage and much more.

Keep up to date with developments via the CRN Weekly Update emailed each Thursday.

About Extras

Extras 1 and Extras 2 are two program slots in the regular CRN Program Guide.

Extras 1 broadcasts between 13:04 - 14:00 EST/EDT; Extras 2 between 14:04 - 15:00 EST/EDT Wednesdays. Extras feature a variety of programs that change week to week. See below for details on the latest Extras programming.

If you missed this content in its broadcast week, contact crn@cbaa.org.au for a file download.

Upcoming Extras

Wednesday 25 March

New York Stories with Joe Pascal Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels

(Part 1 BBC)

1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Presenter Joe Pascal meets meets the Devastating Mic Controller himself - Darryl 'DMC' McDaniels. He grew up in Hollis Queens and was at the forefront of revolutionary change in the New York music scene with the explosion of hip hop. He was there, watching, from the early days, with the DJs and MCs at the neighbourhood block parties. And then, alongside Run and Jam Master Jay, they became a music phenomenon – with their new kind of rap bringing hip hop to the masses. DMC talks us through those early years and his later battles with alcoholism and depression. 

The Legacy of the Cold War Cold War

(Part 1 BBC) 

1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

In The Cold War Legacy, we travel to Europe, Africa, Latin America and Asia to examine what impact the Cold War had back then and how it still resonates today. The Cold War was a battle of ideology, politics, spies and military supremacy, with a sometimes terrifying arms race and nuclear proliferation. Like WW2 before it, the Cold War was truly global as the two camps struggled for influence and control across all continents. It may have officially ended in 1991 but its ramifications can still be felt today, especially with the younger generation who may not have lived through it but are still living with its aftermath.

Part One: Czechoslovakia

Thirty years ago, communism suddenly collapsed across central and eastern Europe, and nowhere did change seem more miraculous than in Czechoslovakia. A ‘velvet revolution’ replaced a stony faced politburo with a beaming playwright, President Vaclav Havel.  There was much talk of democracy, prosperity, and a full embrace of Western values. Three decades on, Chris Bowlby, who knew Czechoslovakia before and after its revolution and split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, returns to see how that change looks now.    

Wednesday 18 March

WOMADelaide Highlights 2020 WOMADelaide Festival

(5UV x 3RRR)

1 x 59'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Veteran host of 3RRR and the CRN's Off The Record Brian Wise will be bringing listeners around Australia the best of Womadelaide 2020, in conjunction with Radio Adelaide. Womadelaide is the premiere world music festival held in Adelaide every year. Hear interviews from the festival  such as Dyson Stringer Cloher, Tami Neilson, the Cat Empire, Salif Keita, Deline Briscoe, L Subrammaniam, Public Opinion Afro Orchestra, Luisa Sobral and many more!

How do we learn from the Chinese response to COVID-19?  Chinese COVID-19 Lockdown

(BBC) 

1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

There are now significantly more new cases of coronavirus outside China than inside. While the authorities have been criticised for their initial slow response to the outbreak, since January they have taken unprecedented action to clamp down on the spread of the virus. China has been accused of infringing civil liberties in its fight against Coronavirus but it has also been praised for the extreme public health measures it has taken. So what did the Chinese actually do and can it be replicated elsewhere?

Wednesday 11 March

Coronavirus in Africa Coronavirus Testing

(BBC)

1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

In the last week of February 2020, Nigeria successfully detected a coronavirus case and traced it back to Milan. It’s a success story which shows the virus screening system they put in place to deal with Ebola is still working. However, what about elsewhere in Africa? The continent has huge Chinese investment, many contacts with Wuhan, the industrial city where Covid-19 originated; there is a good chance the virus has already spread in countries which have limited means of detecting or treating it. Developing a vaccine for the virus is one of the routes to eradicating it, but vaccines usually need to be refrigerated. A team in Texas has come up with a vaccine encased in a film which means it can be transported and used without refrigeration, potentially a huge boost for a global roll out. 

Can the Democrats Beat Trump? American voting sign

(BBC) 

1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

After the results of the Super Tuesday primaries in the United States on March 3, two candidates have emerged as front-runners in the battle for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination: Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders. Which vision for the future of the party will be the one more likely to deliver electoral success across the nation; one that aims to reach out to swing voters and Republicans, or one that energises the base of the party and attempts to bring new people to the polls? Is history a good indicator of how each candidate would perform in the general election, or has politics in America changed beyond recognition? Can Democrats beat President Trump, and if so, how?

Wednesday 04 March

Mardi Gras 2020 Special Part 1Joy FM team broadcasting live from the 2020 Mardi Gras parade

(JOY FM)

1 x 55'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Is there a better way to celebrate the 42nd Annual Gay & Lesbian Sydney Mardi Gras than with a special broadcast? Brought to you live from the parade in Sydney on Saturday 28th of February 2020. Join the team from Joy FM in Melbourne as they bring you the highs, the lows, the glitter and glam from the rooftop of one of Sydney's favourite hangouts on Oxford Street - the Burdekin Hotel. This is the first half of the 2 part special. 

Mardi Gras 2020 Special Part 2  Joy FM team broadcasting live from the 2020 Mardi Gras parade

(JOY FM) 

1 x 55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Is there a better way to celebrate the 42nd Annual Gay & Lesbian Sydney Mardi Gras than with a special broadcast? Brought to you live from the parade in Sydney on Saturday 28th of February 2020. Join the team from Joy FM in Melbourne as they bring you the highs, the lows, the glitter and glam from the rooftop of one of Sydney's favourite hangouts on Oxford Street - the Burdekin Hotel. This is the second half of the 2 part special. 

Wednesday 26 February

Nina Simone: High Priestess of Blues and Civil Rights 

Nina Simone

(8CCC)

1 x 55'48 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

The Last Supper: Twelve Apostles of Black Music takes a look at some of the founders of Black Music. Over the next hour, we're going to hear about the life and musical evolution of one high priestess who traversed jazz, Blues and the US Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. That high priestess is none other than Nina Simone. Stay with me as we hear much of her amazing music and discover how a passionate and embattled life wove between her famous recordings, voice and songs”.

Aretha Franklin: Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin

(8CCC) 

1 x 55'48 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

The Last Supper: Twelve Apostles of Black Music takes a look at some of the founders of Black Music. Over the next hour, we're going to hear about the life and  and musical evolution of Aretha Franklin  covering six decades from Gospel to Soul and back to Gospel. I get to play some of her celebrated tracks including the 1972 live recording of Amazing Grace and make the case why the Queen of Soul has a chair at the Last Supper as my 12th Apostle of Black Music.

Wednesday 19 February

Coxsone Dodd: The history of Jamaican Reggae Coxsone Dodd

(8CCC)

1 x 55'48 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

The Last Supper: Twelve Apostles of Black Music takes a look at some of the founders of Black Music. Over the space of an hour, we're going to hear about the founder and pioneer of Jamaican Reggae music, Coxsone Dodd, producer and owner of Studio One record label in Kingston, Jamaica between 1958 to 2004. We hear much of his amazing music and innovation of early reggae from Ska to Rocksteady with the first ever recording of a young Bob Marley, we call Coxsone Dodd to a seat at the Last Supper.

James Brown: Godfather of Soul James Brown

(8CCC) 

1 x 55'48 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

The Last Supper: Twelve Apostles of Black Music takes a look at some of the founders of Black Music. Over the space of an hour, we're going to hear about the life and musical evolution of James Brown, the Godfather of Soul. Stay with me as we hear much of his amazing music from 1958 to 1974 as we usher the showman, bandleader and singer - we call James Brown to a seat at the Last Supper.

Wednesday 12 February

Impeachment: What have we learned since Nixon? President Richard Nixon

(BBC) 

1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

In 1974, the 37th President of the United States Richard Nixon - resigned after being told by members of his own Republican party that they could no longer support him. The allegations against President Nixon were similar in nature to those leveled at the 45th President Donald Trump. But this week, Mr Trump was acquitted of the two charges against him following his impeachment trial. So, have public attitudes towards allegations of corruption in public office changed over the past four decades?

World Questions: Lagos Street in Lagos, Nigeria

(BBC) 

1 x 49'25 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Nigeria is one of the world’s largest oil producers, but national infrastructure, youth unemployment and insecurity are huge challenges for its civilian government. Jihadist attacks and separatist movements threaten to tear the country apart and despite being the biggest economy south of the Sahara, extreme poverty is very high. What next for Nigeria?

Wednesday 05 February

Is Recycling Broken? Waste

(BBC) 

1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

China used to accept 55% of the world’s plastic and paper waste, but it closed its doors in 2018. Initially, other countries in South East Asia took over China’s waste processing role. But they too are now sending much of the waste back, arguing it is contaminated and is harming their own environments. This has created major problems for countries in the West who traditionally relied on others to process their recycling waste. 

Life After Brexit British House of Parliament

(BBC) 

1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

As the clock strikes 23:00 GMT on Friday 31 January 2020, Britain will be out of the European Union. It will mark the end of a bitter chapter in the country’s history, and the beginning of new one. The Brexit referendum of 2016 and its aftermath has dominated UK politics for the past three and a half years. The atmosphere has been fierce and acrimonious and only in late 2019 did it stabilise with the election of Prime Minister Boris Johnson and a large Conservative majority, on the campaign promise of getting Brexit done. But what does that mean? What can the UK do outside the structures of the EU? What course will the EU chart without the UK inside it? What will life after Brexit look like?

Past Extras 

Wednesday 29 January

Finland - The Race to go Carbon Neutral Fisherman in Finland

(BBC) 

1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

In Finland a fisherman-turned-climate scientist believes he has part of the answer: re-wilding the country’s peat fields. The Finnish government has committed to reducing its carbon emis-sions to net-zero by 2035, that’s 15 years sooner than the UK.

Gabriel Gatehouse travels to Finland to meet Tero Mustonen, as he battles lobbyists and vested interests, in government and the peat industry, in a race to mitigate the consequences of climate change.

Has China learned from SARS? Chinese woman with face-mask

(BBC) 

1 x 49'30 mins - at 14:04 EDT

A mysterious new virus has emerged from the city of Wuhan and is rapidly being identified in patients across the globe. Hundreds have been infected and a handful of deaths have also occurred. This isn’t the first potentially deadly virus to emerge from China - In 2002/3 the SARS virus killed nearly 800 people globally and belonged to the same family of virus as the current outbreak. How much has China’s approach changed? And is the world ready for the next global pandemic, whenever it may come?

Wednesday 22 January

What is climate change doing to cows? Farmer on burnt farm

(BBC) 

1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Bush fires have ripped through unprecidented amounts of land in Australia. They’re thought to have killed hundreds of millions of animals, many of them livestock, which some farmers are burying in mass graves. So on this episode, we ask how climate change is affecting farm animals’ health and what can be done to reduce the industry’s footprint? For answers we turn to three livestock vets who are not only experts in animal medicine and productivity, but also have one of the closest relationships with farmers. What can they do to initiate change?

Hydrogen – the Energy of the Future? Hydrogen powered car

(BBC) 

1 x 26'30 mins - at 14:04 EDT

The production of energy and power is a huge global issue. Fossil fuels are having an impact on the environment, but they have yet to be widely replaced by renewable sources like wind and solar. 2050 is a key year in the climate change calendar. It’s the deadline set by the Paris agreement. Some scientists are pinning their hopes on hydrogen, which is already being developed for use in the car industry, but how can it be further adapted?

Wednesday 15 January

When Freedom, Safety & Democracy Burn Australian Bushfires 2019-20

(4ZZZ)

27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Against toxic smoke, corruption, waning freedoms and government crackdowns, 4ZZZ's Craig Garrett speaks with Dayak environmentalist Emmanuela Shinta (of the Ranu Welum Foundation) to paint us the beauty of Kalimantan and the Dayak peoples. After decades of questionable Australian water licences and Indonesian land permits, unprecedented fires burn under governments critical of those who speak out.   

Step Away from the Car Step Away from the Car Producers 2019

(Parts 6-10 5UV) 

5 x 10'00 mins - at 14:04 EDT

Step Away from the Car is a series of 10 segments that get listeners thinking about using more 'active' choices when it comes to transport, choices that require us stepping away from the car. The Series features transport planners, traffic engineers, community artists, car designers and public health researchers, arguing the economic, business, environmental, public and community health reasons to step away from the car.

Wednesday 8 January

Will humans become extinct by the end of the century? Apocalyptic City

(BBC) 

23'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

What is the chance of the human race surviving the 21st century? There are many dangers – climate change for example, or nuclear war, or a pandemic, or planet Earth being hit by a giant asteroid.

Around the world a number of research centres have sprung up to investigate and moderate what’s called existential risk. How risky is our civilisation and what can be done to stop a global catastrophe?

Step Away from the Car Step Away from the Car Producers 2019

(Parts 1-5 5UV) 

5 x 10'00 mins - at 14:04 EDT

Step Away from the Car is a series of 10 segments that get listeners thinking about using more 'active' choices when it comes to transport, choices that require us stepping away from the car. The Series features transport planners, traffic engineers, community artists, car designers and public health researchers, arguing the economic, business, environmental, public and community health reasons to step away from the car.

Wednesday 1 January

BBCTime Has Chosen Us

(BBC) 

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

The story of the Soviet war in Afghanistan told through its teenage soldiers and the music they created. The 10-year conflict from 1979 to 1989 was one of the most dramatic and consequential wars of modern times. It saw the end of an empire, and triggered a political shockwave that we still live with today.

Time Has Chosen Us tells the story of this under-examined war through the oral histories of Soviet soldiers who reveal honest, sad and funny accounts of their teenage years on the frontlines.

Music Masala 4EBMusic Masala - Parts 8 to 10

(4EB) 

3 x 10'30 mins - at 14:04 EDT

A Spicy Blend of Music and Life. Ten South East Queensland artists interviewed followed by an intimate performance:

  • Menaka Thomas
  • Rozana Azad
  • Amela

Wednesday 25 December 

The Rescue ProjectThe Rescue Project

55'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Produced by Gretchen Miller, The Rescue Project is a partnership between Landcare Australia and UNSW and forms part of a research project into the power of citizen storytelling in environmental communication.

In this special, longer episode of the Rescue Project Podcast, we’re in the Atherton Tablelands in Far North Queensland. Prepare to immerse yourself in the wettest part of the driest continent on earth, a tiny patch of emerald green. A World Heritage area.

We’re walking through the landscape with people living here and collaborating on interconnected projects – looking after tree kangaroos whose fragmented forest habitat needs re connecting, finding seeds for propagation, replanting great tracts of rain forest, and protecting the whole from a tiny but deadly invader – the yellow crazy ant.

Music Masala 4EBMusic Masala - Parts 5 to 7

(4EB) 

3 x 10'30 mins - at 14:04 EDT

A Spicy Blend of Music and Life. Ten South East Queensland artists interviewed followed by an intimate performance:

  • Delnava Ensemble
  • Son Semilla
  • East of West

Wednesday 18 December 

The Rescue ProjectThe Rescue Project

 3 x 13 to 18 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Produced by Gretchen Miller, The Rescue Project is a partnership between Landcare Australia and UNSW and forms part of a research project into the power of citizen storytelling in environmental communication.

Three stories of land and care:

  • We listen to the history of land protection, hear what art reveals that the eye doesn’t see, and reflect on the meaning of saving just one tree.
  • Three short stories which capture deep interactions between humans and other creatures. 
  • And three stories of care for the land. We’re travelling to farm country near Tumut, NSW, then across the Blue Mountains to a hidden valley and then to the Brisbane suburbs, as a simple pile of grass clippings threaten a small patch of local bush.

Music Masala 4EBMusic Masala - Parts 1 to 4

(4EB) 

4 x 10'30 mins - at 14:04 EDT

A Spicy Blend of Music and Life. Ten South East Queensland artists interviewed followed by an intimate performance:

  • Innessa
  • Saraima
  • Saba Ensemble (pictured)
  • Matt Hsu

Wednesday 11 December 

Remote Indigenous Media Festival Podcast Showcase RIMF Podcast Creators

(CMTO x CRN)

 1 x 31'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

In this showcase, curated by the Community Media Training Organisations' Mikaela Ford, you will hear 6 exceptional podcasts that were produced by delegates at the 20th Remote Indigenous Media Festival, held from the 22-27 September this year. This year's festival was held on the remote Thursday Island, and held in conjunction with First Nations Media Austrlaia, and the Torres Strait Island Media Association. This Showcase was produced in conjunction with the CRN. 

 

The World's Languages are Dying Man with Moose

(BBC) 

 1 x 49'30 mins - at 15:04 EST

The world’s rich linguistic tapestry is unravelling. Around a third of the world’s languages now have fewer than a thousand speakers left. The UN says more needs to be done, and to raise awareness it declared 2019 the year of indigenous languages. The numbers of languages heading for extinction number in the thousands and are spoken by small tribes and ethnic groups scattered around the world. Join Julian Worricker and his panel of expert guests, as they discuss how we keep thousands of minority languages alive in an era when just 23 languages account for half the world’s population.

Wednesday 04 December 

Why is there a Backlash against Climate Policies? Yellow Vest Protesters, France 2019

(BBC)

 1 x 23'00, & 27'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

In 2018, more than a quarter of a million people took to the streets across France, in what became known as the “gilets jaunes” protests. They began as a reaction to an increase in fuel tax; a tax which was supposed to help the environment but to the protesters, it meant they could no longer afford to drive their cars or get to work. These were the first high profile demonstrations against policies designed to tackle climate change, but they put a spotlight on a sense of unrest that has spread far beyond France. So if it is widely accepted that climate change is a real threat, why is there a backlash against climate policies?

National Features and Documentary Series 2019 

Part 7-8 (CBAA & CMTO) 

 2 x 25'50 mins - at 15:04 EST

Continuing on with the next two parts of the National Features and Documentary Series for 2019. The NFDS is a showcase of new radio works from Australian community radio producers. Eight participants were chosen in early 2019 after submitting an idea for a new feature. They were then trained and mentored by the Community Media Training Organisation to turn their idea into feature for a national audience. It is here that you will listen to the final pieces of this years series; Living in Paradise by Mia Armitage, and Kings of the Desert by Saad Khalid.

Wednesday 27 November

Disability Day 2019 Disability Day 2019 Poster

Parts 1-2 (3CR)

 2 x 25'00, & 27'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Tuesday the 3rd of December is Disability Day for 2019. Our friends at 3CR will be celebrating the day with dedicated programming, hearing from the voices of the BIPOC community (Black People, Indigenous People, and People of Colour) with various kinds of disabilities. We have three specials here for you to use for the day, with the third appearing in Extras 2 at 14:04: 

DSP Denied (25'00)

  • What do you do if your disability isn't recognised as a disability by the state, but your disability reduces your capacity to work? Fijian Mereani Qalovakawasa talks to Pauline Vetuna about her experience of living with Lupus on Newstart.

Free As A Bird (27'00)

  • Deadly advocate Jane Rosengrave is free as a bird - but the road to freedom was long and tough. In this program, Jane talks about leaving abusive relationships, fighting institutional abuse, finding her power through self advocacy and independence.

Disability Day 2019 Disability Day 2019 Poster

Part 3 (3CR)

4 x 25'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Disabled Parent, Disabled Child & the NDIS (23'00)

  • Cubbie Mako is a migrant POC with disabilities and parent of a child with Downs Syndrome, cancer and hearing impairment. They share lived experiences and advice from the trenches as they navigate the complexity of the NDIS for their child.

National Features and Documentary Series 2019 

Part 5-6 (CBAA & CMTO) 

 2 x 25'50 mins - at 15:04 EST

Continuing on with the next two parts of the National Features and Documentary Series for 2019. The NFDS is a showcase of new radio works from Australian community radio producers. Eight participants were chosen in early 2019 after submitting an idea for a new feature. They were then trained and mentored by the Community Media Training Organisation to turn their idea into feature for a national audience. It is here that you will listen to pieces from four of our finalists; Transport for People with Disability by David Brown, & Eradicating Difference by Amy McMurtrie.

Wednesday 20 November 

Extinction Elegies Red Room Poetry Logo

Part 3 (Red Room Poetry)

 1 x 27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

In this final episode of the Extinction Elegies radio series, titled 'The Loss of Australian Biodiversity', we explore cultural connections to Country and wedge-tailed eagles with Ali Cobby Eckerman. Meanwhile, poet Stuart Cooke examines the entanglement of human life with the northern long-nosed potoroo and Professor Sarah Bekessy speaks to ways we might increase sustainability in urban areas.

 

National Features and Documentary Series 2019 

Part 1-4 (CBAA & CMTO) 

 4 x 25'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Welcome to the first four parts of the National Features and Documentary Series for 2019. The NFDS is a showcase of new radio works from Australian community radio producers. Eight participants were chosen in early 2019 after submitting an idea for a new feature. They were then trained and mentored by the Community Media Training Organisation to turn their idea into feature for a national audience. It is here that you will listen to pieces from four of our finalists; The CWA and the F Word by Alice Ansara, Yurala by Marion Cheedy, Living Water & Money to Make by Dylan Storer & Let It Fly: The Namok’s Legacy by Bernard Namok Jnr. 

Wednesday 13 November

Extinction Elegies Red Room Poetry Logo

Part 2 (Red Room Poetry)

 1 x 27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

In this three-part radio series, six eminent Australian poets and three extinction experts share their poems and reflect on losses of animals significant to them. In episode two titled 'Art and Science', Poet Bruce Pascoe honours the azure kingfisher and Mark Tredinnick laments the plastic seas that swallow species and language, while Dr Thomas Bristow explores the history of the elegy and its role in eco-criticism.

 

India’s Environmental Record Indian Air Pollution

(BBC) 

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

The Indian capital, Delhi, is facing an environmental emergency. The air pollution level has been so high that monitors could not record the toxicity in the air because it was off the scale. Fifteen of the world's twenty most polluted cities are in India. India is already the world's third biggest emitter of greenhouse gases; and some are questioning whether the government is promoting economic growth at a cost to the climate. So how bad are India's environmental problems? And is it possible for the country to transition into a green economy?

Wednesday 06 November 

Extinction Elegies Red Room Poetry Logo

Part 1 (Red Room Poetry)

 1 x 27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

In this three-part radio series, six eminent Australian poets and three extinction experts share their poems and reflect on losses of animals significant to them. In Episode One of our Extinction Elegies radio series titled 'Isalnd Ecologies', poet Michelle Cahill reflects on the eradication of the King Island Emu, while John Kinsella discusses the demise of the Christmas Island Pipistrelle. Island and extinction specialist Professor John Woinarski contextualises these losses and what they mean in the bigger picture of extinctions in Australia.

Rocking the Stasi Old Communication Equipment

(BBC) 

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Since the former East German Police archives in Germany have opened, one of the most remarkable to emerge is how the East German regime - and in particular the Stasi - were obsessed with resisting and clamping down on Western music.Chris Bowlby uncovers this fascinating aspect of Cold War history. For the first time, we hear recordings of secret meetings in which Stasi Chief Erich Mielke discussed the threat of punk and heavy metal. Against the backdrop of a stellar soundtrack we hear from those who organised secret and illegal concerts in East Germany and from a former member of the Stasi who tried to stop them.

Wednesday 30 October 

Is Vaping Safe? Girl Vaping

(BBC)

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

After deaths in the US and bans around the world, how risky are e-cigarettes? In the UK, doctors say if smokers switch from tobacco to e-cigarettes, it will save lives, but in the US where the authorities are investigating an outbreak of lung injury linked to vaping, they’re advising vapers to consider stopping. Vaping is still relatively new and scientists are still researching how harmful it may be in the long-term. What are the potential health risks associated with vaping?

Mass Protests in Lebanon Lebanon Protests

(BBC) 

 1 x 40'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

A lack of jobs, crumbling public services, rising living costs and rampant inequality had millions of people out on the streets of Lebanon demanding change in all sections of their society. The proposed budget with more taxes, including one on WhatsApp, is seen as the straw that broke the camel’s back. So is Lebanon in the midst of a revolution? Do the protests reflect a generation that is ready to look beyond a system of sectarian patronage?

Wednesday 23 October 

Is Maths Real? Math Problems on Blackboard

(BBC)

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Faced with one cake and eight hungry people, it’s pretty obvious how maths underpins reality. But as mathematics gets further from common sense and into seemingly abstract territory, nature still seems to obey its rules. But what exactly is the relationship between mathematics and reality? Is maths a human construct to help us make sense of reality - a tool, a model, a language? Does maths create its own reality? Or is it reality itself?

The Cat: In From the Wild Ancient Egyptian Cat

(BBC) 

 1 x 40'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Domesticated cats are thought to have started living alongside humans more than 9000 years ago. Unlike dogs, it’s believed cats domesticated themselves, entering the homes of early arable farmers in the Fertile Crescent to control the rodent population. Since then, they’ve been worshipped, vilified, tortured, and revered by various societies around the world. Rajan Datar welcomes three experts in science, culture and archaeology to discuss the history of the domesticated cat.

Wednesday 16 October 

Are we Heading for a Global Recession?  Shipping Yard

(BBC)

 1 x 23'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The world’s two biggest economies are fighting a trade war, European growth is slowing and global manufacturing data looks grim. Financial markets are flashing warning signs. It’s been a decade since the last global recession and in 2019 so far, the data has started to turn down. Are we on the verge of an economic meltdown? And what can countries do to avoid recession or reduce its impact when it comes?

In the Studio with World of Warcraft In the Studio with World of Warcraft

(BBC) 

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

World of Warcraft is one of the most popular computer games on the planet & has sustained that popularity for 15 years. The key to it's success is maintaining the desire of players to come back for more, day after day. Alex follows the team as they prepare for their next content update; she talks to writers, producers & sound designers to find out how each of them play their part in creating Azeroth. Each step along the way contributes to the player experience & the success of the game.

Wednesday 09 October 

Southern Stars Independent Country Music Awards 2019 Southern Star Award Winner

Part 1 (GMC)

 1 x 54'40 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Recorded live from the Mercy Theatre Mildura as part of the Mildura Country Music Festival, the Good Morning Country team broadcast the Southern Stars Independent Country Music Awards for 2019 over the weekend. Including the full awards show with performances from the best independent musicians that Australian country has to offer. Heard in two highlights packages, this is part one of the awards.

Southern Stars Independent Country Music Awards 2019 Southern Star Award Winner

Part 2 (GMC) 

 1 x 55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Recorded live from the Mercy Theatre Mildura as part of the Mildura Country Music Festival, the Good Morning Country team broadcast the Southern Stars Independent Country Music Awards for 2019 over the weekend. Including the full awards show with performances from the best independent musicians that Australian country has to offer. Heard in two highlights packages, this is part two of the awards. 

Wednesday 02 October 

Spirit of Woman  Heather and Helen Oxenham

(5UV)

 1 x 34'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Spirit of Woman is an Adelaide project working to build statues or memorials to women enduring or killed by domestic violence. It’s the latest brainchild of Helen Oxenham, now in her 80’s, who established one of SA’s first women’s shelters over 40 years ago. Spirit of Woman is also a series of interviews with Helen, her own story of growing up with a violent father in Dublin and becoming a lifelong campaigner against domestic violence and violence against women. 

How Will the Hong Kong Protests End? Hong Kong Protests 2019

(BBC World Service) 

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

This week was the 70th anniversary of China's founding, the great fanfare playing out across the state could be overshadowed by events in the territory of Hong Kong, which is part of China but has separate judicial and economic freedoms. For months people have been taking to the streets every weekend to rally against a controversial extradition bill. The protests have turned into a movement calling for democracy, and an investigation into allegations of police brutality during the protests. 

Wednesday 25 September 

World War II: The Economic Battle photo of vehicles from WWII

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The story of World War II is usually told in terms of heroism on the battlefield, but perhaps the most important struggle was the economic battle. To mark the 80th anniversary of the start of World War II economist Duncan Weldon examines how the economies of the European powers, set the scene for the conduct of the war in 1939 and 1940. He also discovers how they produced weapons, how they secured oil, how they fed their populations and how a lack of resources dictated the path of war.

The Hugging Dentists The hugging dentists

(BBC World Service) 

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

For some, going to the dentist can cause a lot of anxiety. We bring together two Australian dentists who have come up with creative ways to support their patients. Dr Sharonne Zaks has over 20 years of experience in private practice in Melbourne, with a special focus on anxious patients, and survivors of sexual assault and trauma. Dr Sonia Sonia is a dentist based in Brisbane, who also focuses on domestic violence victims. Her biggest reward is putting the smile back on someone's face.

Wednesday 18 September 

History Lab: Episode 7 No More War Poster

(2SER)

 1 x 30'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

History Lab is a New York Festivals Radio Award winning series that explores history in interesting ways. History Lab asks you to come along to make sense of the traces the past leaves in the present: records are patchy, evidence is destroyed and a lot of the time people disagree about what happened and what it means. History Lab is produced in partnership with the Australian Centre for Public History.

In this episode, a century after the war we are still questioning our ability to come together.

Mojo Juju and the Aboriginal Comedy All Stars Steph Tisdell

(BBC World Service) 

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

We head to Melbourne and the land of the Kulin Nations for the Blak & Bright Festival, a celebration of Australia’s First Nations writers, playwrights and poets. The writer and festival director Jane Harrison and the poet and educator Evelyn Araluen, explain why the festival is essential for culture in today’s Australia. Two of the brightest stars in Australian comedy, Steph Tisdell and Andy Saunders of the Aboriginal Comedy All Stars tell Tina how they combine comedy and culture to cook up fierce, fresh and funny stand-up. Plus, the singer Mojo Juju shares the story of how her life and her award winning album Native Tongue were shaped by her mixed indigenous Wiradjuri and Filipino heritage.

Wednesday 11 September 

History Lab: Episode 6 Jelly Babies

(2SER)

 1 x 30'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

History Lab is a New York Festivals Radio Award winning series that explores history in interesting ways. History Lab asks you to come along to make sense of the traces the past leaves in the present: records are patchy, evidence is destroyed and a lot of the time people disagree about what happened and what it means. History Lab is produced in partnership with the Australian Centre for Public History.

In the sixth episode, we find the patternmakers, who create much of the stuff we use every day.

Would You Make Music for No Money? Music Life cast

(BBC World Service) 

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Join Swindle, (an instrumentalist and music producer)  R&B singer songwriter Joel Culpepper, vocalist Lioness, and multi-instrumentalist composer Ahnanse. Led by Swindle, they discuss how the city you grow up in influences your sound, the weirdest place they’ve recorded a song and would they still be doing this if there was no financial reward. Swindle aims to get to the bottom of how they all do what they do, and why they do it. In the second part of the episode, Joel Culpepper plays some of his favourite tracks, and tells stories around a playlist he has called ‘The Different Faces of Soul’

Wednesday 04 September 

History Lab: Episode 5 Colonial Official

(2SER)

 1 x 30'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

History Lab is a New York Festivals Radio Award winning series that explores history in interesting ways. History Lab asks you to come along to make sense of the traces the past leaves in the present: records are patchy, evidence is destroyed and a lot of the time people disagree about what happened and what it means. History Lab is produced in partnership with the Australian Centre for Public History.

In the fifth episode, follow the trail and discover the foundations of Australia's first bank.

Who Owns the Amazon? Amazon Rainforest Fire

(BBC World Service) 

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

The Amazon is seen as an essential part of maintaining the earth's ecosystem & weather patterns. But this year thousands of intense fires are ravaging in the rainforest; many of which are believed to have been started deliberately. Brazil's indigenous & environmental groups have raised alarm at the rate of deforestation caused by the fires. Should the Amazon be treated as a world treasure with a consensus over its preservation? Or, should its home countries have sovereignty over their forests?

Wednesday 28 August 

History Lab: Episode 4 First Nations Woman Fishing

(2SER)

 1 x 30'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

History Lab is a New York Festivals Radio Award winning series that explores history in interesting ways. History Lab asks you to come along to make sense of the traces the past leaves in the present: records are patchy, evidence is destroyed and a lot of the time people disagree about what happened and what it means. History Lab is produced in partnership with the Australian Centre for Public History.

The fourth episode explores the songs of the Eora women that once fished Sydney's coastlines.

How Can I Motivate Myself?

(BBC World Service) Yes You Can written in sand

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Many of us struggle to motivate ourselves to carry out certain tasks, from hanging up the washing to writing a job application. How can we best motivate ourselves? And how can we avoid procrastination? Listener Moses wants to find out. Setting out to uncover the secrets of motivation is presenter Anand Jagatia who puts the science to the test as he tries to motivate himself to train for a swimming race.

Wednesday 21 August 

History Lab: Episode 3 Outback Desert

(2SER)

 1 x 30'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

History Lab is a New York Festivals Radio Award winning series that explores history in interesting ways. History Lab asks you to come along to make sense of the traces the past leaves in the present: records are patchy, evidence is destroyed and a lot of the time people disagree about what happened and what it means. History Lab is produced in partnership with the Australian Centre for Public History.

The third episode asks why exactly a monument to the ship the Titanic exists 400km inland, in the Australian town Broken Hill. 

Keeping Mum Suezanne Reece Headshot

(5UV)

 1 x 14'58 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Suzanne Reece has produced a lot of live radio, but she’s also produced some great documentaries. Her latest, Keeping Mum, features a daughter talking about being raised by a lesbian mum in the 90's and keeping it all secret.

Wednesday 14 August 

History Lab: Episode 2 Classic Artwork

(2SER)

 1 x 28'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

History Lab is a New York Festivals Radio Award winning series that explores history in interesting ways. History Lab asks you to come along to make sense of the traces the past leaves in the present: records are patchy, evidence is destroyed and a lot of the time people disagree about what happened and what it means. History Lab is produced in partnership with the Australian Centre for Public History.

The second episode focuses on a the damages of a broken heart, in the secret history of love that is buried away in Westen Sydney's state archives.

National Indigenous Music Awards 2019 NIMAs 2019

(TEEABA Part 1-2)

 2 x 55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Over the weekend was the night of nights for First Nations' music, the National Indigenous Music Awards exceeded expectations, producing the annual award ceremnoy's largest ever crown, as well as an amazing variety of stellar live performances, all held under the stars at Darwin's iconic amphitheatre.

Over two parts, we deliver the best of the NIMAs 2019, thanks to our friends at the Top End Aboriginal Bush Broadcasting Association (TEABBA), with performances from Tasman Keith, the Larrakia/Belyuen, Mornington Island and North Winds dancers, Baker Boy, Archie Roach, Deborah Cheetman, and Spnifex Gum, the all-girl choir, and major award categories like, film clip of the year, young artist of the year and song of the year. 

Wednesday 07 August 

History Lab: Episode 1 Lindy Chamberlain

(2SER)

 1 x 28'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

History Lab is a New York Festivals Radio Award winning series that explores history in interesting ways. History Lab asks you to come along to make sense of the traces the past leaves in the present: records are patchy, evidence is destroyed and a lot of the time people disagree about what happened and what it means. History Lab is produced in partnership with the Australian Centre for Public History.

The series will be comprised seven episodes over the next seven weeks. The first episode focuses on the case of Lindy Chamberlain, and the afterlife of evidence.

Nineteen Eighty-Four: Orwell’s dystopian classic George Orwell's 1984

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 40'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

In the 70 years since its publication, George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four has penetrated popular culture but also public discourse to a degree rarely achieved by a work of fiction. It sets out a vision of life under a totalitarian state, where its citizens are watched 24 hours a day and everything is controlled by The Party. Modern-day readers have found the novel speaks to those concerned by an increase in surveillance, data sharing or the manipulation of facts.

Wednesday 31 July 

The Politics of Boris JohnsonBoris Johnson

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Boris Johnson has become the Prime Minister of Britain at a time when the country is facing numerous challenges at home and abroad. In his acceptance speech, he said that he would deliver Brexit, unite the country, and defeat the left-wing opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn. His supporters admire him for his colourful politics and quick-witted oratory skills, but he has also been described as untrustworthy and divisive by members of his own party. So, what kind of politics can Boris Johnson offer?  

How Music Festivals Change Culture Music Festival

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

The music scene is changing with a growing market for festivals; we look at their history, their future, and the challenges of staging them. We go inside the festival that reshaped the future of the Balkans. We speak to the Will Roger, co-founder of Burning Man about the people that gather every year in the middle of the Nevada desert. As well as highlighting two revolutionary festivals; Diva in the UK and State in Sweeden, that is for women, non-binary and transgender people only.

Wednesday 24 July 

Music to Land on the Moon by

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

On the 50th anniversary of the first Moon landings, Beatriz De La Pava researches how real life events are reflected in the lyrics of popular songs, and shows how music can paint a vivid picture of the social, political, economic, and cultural landscape.

From Frank Sinatra’s Fly Me to the Moon, when reaching outer space was merely a metaphor for love, through to the Apollo 11 mission; narrated by bands like The Byrds and Public Service Broadcasting.

Religion and climate change in Nairobi

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

For the BBC World Service, Nairobi based journalist and broadcaster Ciru Muriuki brings together young people of different faiths, together with a live audience, at the National Museum in Nairobi, Kenya, to hear what people want from their religious leaders and hear how faith motivates their activism.

Wednesday 17 July 

Beyond the Bars 

Part 1 (3CR)

 1 x 55'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDTBeyond the Bars 3CR

Part 2 (3CR) 

 1 x 55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Each year during NAIDOC Week, 3CR presents Beyond the Bars - live prison radio shows featuring the stories, poems, songs and opinions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and women in the Victorian prison system. This year the all-Black broadcast team will hear from 100 men and women across the Dame Phyllis Frost Centre, Barwon Prison, Fulham Correctional Centre, Marngoneet Correctional Centre, Karreenga Annex, Loddon Prison and Port Phillip Prison. In Part 2, hear from the men that reside Beyond the Bars. 

Wednesday 10 July 

Mystify - A Musical Journey with Michael Hutchence Mystify INXS

Part 1-2 (Paradise FM)

 2 x 15'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

The 5th of July saw the international release of Mystify - A Musical Journey with Michael Hutchence. To commemorate the release, Ballina's Paradise FM and Petrol Records have collaborated to bring a world exclusive preview of the album. All stations can access and air this special as 4 x 15'00 parts. Hear exclusive interviews with former INXS manager Chris Murphy and Australian music producer Mark Edwards, and plenty of archival recordings never before released to the public.  

Mystify - A Musical Journey with Michael Hutchence  Mystify INXS

Part 3-4 (Paradise FM) 

 2 x 15'00 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

The 5th of July saw the international release of Mystify - A Musical Journey with Michael Hutchence. To commemorate the release, Ballina's Paradise FM and Petrol Records have collaborated to bring a world exclusive preview of the album. All stations can access and air this special as 4 x 15'00 parts. Hear exclusive interviews with former INXS manager Chris Murphy and Australian music producer Mark Edwards, and plenty of archival recordings never before released to the public.  

Wednesday 03 July 

Vaccination: The Global Picture Vaccination

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Across the world, fake news, a lack of access to reliable healthcare and medical supplies, poverty, religious leaders and a mistrust of authority are all cited as reasons for vaccination numbers falling. So far this year there have been 800 cases of measles, spreading through communities where vaccination rates are low. The mayor of New York has declared a health emergency, ordering mandatory vaccinations under threat of fines, but will such measures be counter-productive? Resistance to immunisation is not new, so how do we combat this resistance that is adding to the problem?

Communities In Control 2019 Communities In Control 2019

Part 3-4 (CiC) 

 2 x 15'00 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Two days after the shock federal election result, the Communities in Control conference couldn’t have come at a better time for organisations fearing for the future, with its clarion call to “Get Angry. Then Get Organised.” This event generates inspiration, hope, and very personal connections. Without exception, each speaker brought home the message “We’re here to change things for the better.” In the final parts, listen to inspiring talks and performances about equality and change from individuals such as David Manne, Mariam Veiszadeh, and speakers from the Community Innovation Showcase. 

Wednesday 26 June 

No Land, No Livelihood, No Home 

Part 9-10 (4EB)

 2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Presented by Maureen Mopio from 4EB, this program showcases opinions from women and experts about the continuing effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands and Torres Strait. Over 10-parts, hear first hand from communities displaced by climate change, seeking climate justice and fighting for their survival. In the last two episodes, hear CSIRO scientist, John Clarke provide projections on the changes in weather patterms, wprld climate, and the gradual increase of temperatures, as well as Oxfam climate change advisor, Simon Bradshaw, on the economic effects of a changing climate. Finally, hear from Melbourned based CSIRO scientist Michael Grose about the complex science of climate change, as well as highlights of interviews throughout the series. 

Communities In Control 2019 Communities In Control 2019

Part 1-2 (CiC) 

 2 x 15'00 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Two days after the shock federal election result, the Communities in Control conference couldn’t have come at a better time for organisations fearing for the future, with its clarion call to “Get Angry. Then Get Organised.” This event generates inspiration, hope, and very personal connections. Without exception, each speaker brought home the message “We’re here to change things for the better.” In these two parts, listen to inspiring talks and performances about equality and change from individuals such as Tracy Spicer, Professor Helen Milroy, Shane Howard, Father Rod Bower, and Professor Lea Waters.

Wednesday 19 June 

No Land, No Livelihood, No Home 

Part 7-8 (4EB)

 2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Presented by Maureen Mopio from 4EB, this program showcases opinions from women and experts about the continuing effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands and Torres Strait. Over 10-parts, hear first hand from communities displaced by climate change, seeking climate justice and fighting for their survival. In the seventh and eighth episodes, hear a call to action to end gender inbalnced issues when it comes to climate change, with guests Sharon Backwan-Rolls, the former director of FEMLINK, Dr Esther Onyango, a biologist and researcher and Larissa Waters QLD Senator for the Greens. These episodes also focus on the impacts of climate change to the islands of the Torres Strait. 

In the Studio: Making Midge Ure’s New Guitar with Jimmy Moon Jimmy Moon

(BBC World Service) 

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Guitar maker Jimmy Moon builds a custom-made guitar for the Scottish singe/songwriter Midge Ure. Jimmy has made guitars for a number of famous musicians, including Coldplay, Bryan Adams, Simple Minds, Primevals, Cherrygrove and the Scissor Sisters. 

Wednesday 12 June 

No Land, No Livelihood, No Home 

Part 5-6 (4EB)

 2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Presented by Maureen Mopio from 4EB, this program showcases opinions from women and experts about the continuing effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands and Torres Strait. Over 10-parts, hear first hand from communities displaced by climate change, seeking climate justice and fighting for their survival. In the fift and sixth episodes, hear from research fellow Anja Kanngieser who has worked with locals for a community led response on Cilmate Change impacts to the pacific, student Cassie Stevens does a voxpop on climate awareness, and Fiji based FEMLINK, which is a Pacific weather monitor that sends easily accesible warnings to preapre disadvantaged women for environmental disasters. 

Thirteen Minutes to the Moon

(BBC World Service) Astronaut

 1 x 25'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

In January 1967, the Apollo programme was hit by a devastating tragedy. The crew of the first planned human mission was killed in a fire, during tests in their capsule on the launch pad a month before launch. The Apollo 1 disaster revealed design flaws and organizational weaknesses in NASA’s race to meet its goal of taking humans to the moon by the end of that decade. There was a twenty one month period of recovery, which culminated in Apollo’s first successful manned mission into earth’s orbit; this was Apollo 7, which some say was the Apollo programme’s finest hour. However, that mission was not without controversy because of the argumentative relationship between Apollo 7’s commander Wally Schirra and the team at Mission Control.

Wednesday 05 June 

No Land, No Livelihood, No Home 

Part 4 (4EB)

 1 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Presented by Maureen Mopio from 4EB, this program showcases opinions from women and experts about the continuing effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands and Torres Strait. Over 10-parts, hear first hand from communities displaced by climate change, seeking climate justice and fighting for their survival. In the fourth episode, hear from 350 Pacific Climate Warrior coordinator, Lisa Jamieson of Samoan heritage, as well as the Pacific Islands Council of QLD Representative, Stella-Miria-Robinson of PNG heritage. 

Bluesfest Interviews

Part 3 (Bay FM, 3ZZZ, Eastside FM) Bluesfest 30th Anniversary logo

 5 x 9'15 mins - 18'00 Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Showcasing the best in international and Australian acts from the 30th anniversary of Bluesfest (1990 - 2019). The interviews have been provided from the stations Bay FM, 3ZZZ and Eastside FM, which include live performances from some of the artists, and showcase the festival from a multitude of community broadcasting perspectives. Part 3 focusses on the third day of the festival, where we are lucky to hear from Deva Mala, Benny Walker, Nathaniel Rateliff, Larkin Poe, and Jessy Loyd from Mission Songs. 

Wednesday 29 May 

No Land, No Livelihood, No Home 

Part 3 (4EB)

 1 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Presented by Maureen Mopio from 4EB, this program showcases opinions from women and experts about the continuing effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands and Torres Strait. Over 10-parts, hear first hand from communities displaced by climate change, seeking climate justice and fighting for their survival. In the third episode, hear from 3 Pacific women leaders from Tonga and Kiribati who discuss the need to maintain culture, food, and crops for future generations, including a call from the Pacific Calling Partnership to 'save Kiribati and humanity'. 

Bluesfest Interviews

Part 2 (Bay FM, 3ZZZ, Eastside FM) Bluesfest 30th Anniversary logo

 3 x 10'48 mins - 17'15 Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Showcasing the best in international and Australian acts from the 30th anniversary of Bluesfest (1990 - 2019). The interviews have been provided from the stations Bay FM, 3ZZZ and Eastside FM, which include live performances from some of the artists, and showcase the festival from a multitude of community broadcasting perspectives. Part 2 focusses on the second day of the festival, where we are lucky to hear from Colin Hay, I'm With Her, and Kasey Chambers. 

Wednesday 22 May 

No Land, No Livelihood, No Home 

Part 1-2 (4EB)

 2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Presented by Maureen Mopio from 4EB, this program showcases opinions from women and experts about the continuing effects of climate change in the Pacific Islands and Torres Strait. Over 10-parts, hear first hand from communities displaced by climate change, seeking climate justice and fighting for their survival. In the first two episodes, here from displaced people from the Carteret Islands, as well as resilient communities tackling climate change through micro-finance, new farming methods and education. 

Bluesfest Interviews

Part 1 (Bay FM, 3ZZZ, Eastside FM) Bluesfest 30th Anniversary logo

 5 x 4'45 mins - 18'15 Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Showcasing the best in international and Australian acts from the 30th anniversary of Bluesfest (1990 - 2019). The interviews have been provided from the stations Bay FM, 3ZZZ and Eastside FM, which include live performances from some of the artists, and showcase the festival from a multitude of community broadcasting perspectives. Part 1 focusses on the first day of the festival, where we are lucky to hear from Markus King, Anderson East, Snarky Puppy and Australia's very own Dobby.  

Wednesday 15 May 

The Documentary: Slavery's Untold Story Cherokee Native Peoples

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Since the emancipation of the slaves in the 19th century, there has been an often uneasy relationship between the so called “Freedmen” and their former masters, both racial minorities with long histories of persecution in the US. This documentary uncovers their extraordinary twinned history, and investigates its legacy for the two communities today.

A History of Music and Technology

(BBC World Service)electric guitar

 1 x 48'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

A nine-part series, narrated by Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason, exploring a history of the instruments and studio innovations which have shaped popular music over the past century. We look at programme number three, focussing on the most influential instrument of the past century: the electric guitar. It’s the sound of rock n roll, and we trace its Hawaiian roots to it's first performance on Halloween 1932. We learn how the guitar got loud through advances in amplification, and how this phallic symbol for peacock rock stars, is now finding huge appeal among female musicians – who today buy nearly half of all guitars sold.

Wednesday 08 May 

Discovery: A Sense of TimeFlying bird

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Does a second feel the same for a fly, a bird, or a swordfish, as it does for me? Geoff Marsh drills into the science of time perception within and between species. Animal senses reveal a wealth of information that humans can't access - But how do different species sense time? Science reveals a window into the minds of different species and their temporal perceptions. This programme delves into each moment of experience to ask, what is time biologically?

The Documentary: When the Things Start to TalkAI phone

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

We’re becoming increasingly familiar with things that talk, in the form of the internet of things; devices that communicate with each other across networks. We see them increasingly in everyday life, controlling the heating systems in our houses or entertainment provided by voice activated assistants. Artificial intelligence, autonomous devices, self-driving cars; what’s the potential and pitfalls of living in a world of ‘things’ which talk to each other as well as to us?

Wednesday 01 May 

The Real Story: Is Social Media Killing Elections?social media

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Some argue that social media has levelled the playing field and opened up political space for people who previously had no voice. At the same time, there is plentiful evidence of foreign interference and the use of social media to spread disinformation in elections in the United States, Brazil, Kenya and India to name just a few.

So is it time for social media to be further regulated for the sake of democracy? Can technology companies be trusted to come up with their own solutions, or should governments intervene and make new laws? And if the state does step in, how can repression, surveillance and censorship be avoided? Join Celia Hatton and her guests as they delve into the murky world of social media and elections.

The Documentary: Dark Fibres and the Frozen Northdata centre

(BBC World Service)

 1 x 26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

If data is the new oil, are data centres the new oil rigs?

Far into the North of Europe, under half a year of darkness, where the landscape has inspired folklore and legend, are some of the biggest data centres in the world. The frozen mountains and deep fjords under the aurora hide the “dark fibre“ for the modern internet to function in the way we all want it to - instantly and reliably. 90% of the world’s data has been created in the last few years, and as a more internet enabled future, with Ai and the internet of things, becomes reality – data more than ever needs a physical home. This requires energy, and by 2020 some estimate around 20% of the world’s energy supply will be used to process data. This can be hugely costly, and damaging for the environment.

Wednesday 24 April 

AustralianSuper Made EasyAustralian Super CAAMA Crew 2019

Parts 5 - 7 (CAAMA)

 3 x 12'56 to 16'06 - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

According to the recent Royal Commission on Banking, many First Nations Peoples are at the discriminatory end when it comes to information about their money. Notably, levels of financial literacy, remoteness and proof of identity were highlighted as broad issues affecting banking, superannuation and insurance outcomes which often impact the lives of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. 

Gilmore Johnston, Station Manager for Alice Springs based CAAMA Radio says, “The hope is to empower Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander fund members to access information to find out about their money. It’s their right!” 

The program offers practical information and encourages members to use a free phone Helpline to obtain updates on their funds, find out the value of their personal or family superannuation and how to access funds and insurance in the case of funeral costs and “Sorry” Business.

The Road to Bluesfest 

Part 3 (2HHH)

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

A 3-part music documentary series, focusing on the excitement and build-up to Bluesfest 2019. Presenter Graeme Doyle (host of The Live Rock Report, Triple H 100.1FM, Hornsby, NSW), together with contributors Noddy (Aussie Music Weekly, Community Radio Network) and Rufus On Fire (The Music Almanac, Triple H 100.1FM, Hornsby, NSW) take an in-depth look at the festival in what is its 30th year. It’s a series of great music, interviews and discussion, which will both entertain and inform listeners.In the final episode, The Road To Bluesfest crew talk about their festival highlights from the 2019 event. Rufus On Fire focuses on one of Bluesfest’s returning acts Ben Harper and The Innocent Criminals. Graeme gets hands-on with all things music photography. More great music including Mavis Staples, Archie Roach and Jack Johnson.

Wednesday 17 April 

AustralianSuper Made EasyAustralian Super CAAMA Crew 2019

Parts 1 - 4 (CAAMA)

 4 x 12'56 to 16'06 - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

According to the recent Royal Commission on Banking, many First Nations Peoples are at the discriminatory end when it comes to information about their money. Notably, levels of financial literacy, remoteness and proof of identity were highlighted as broad issues affecting banking, superannuation and insurance outcomes which often impact the lives of many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. 

Gilmore Johnston, Station Manager for Alice Springs based CAAMA Radio says, “The hope is to empower Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander fund members to access information to find out about their money. It’s their right!” 

The program offers practical information and encourages members to use a free phone Helpline to obtain updates on their funds, find out the value of their personal or family superannuation and how to access funds and insurance in the case of funeral costs and “Sorry” Business.

The Road to Bluesfest 

Part 2 (2HHH)

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

A 3-part music documentary series, focusing on the excitement and build-up to Bluesfest 2019. Presenter Graeme Doyle (host of The Live Rock Report, Triple H 100.1FM, Hornsby, NSW), together with contributors Noddy (Aussie Music Weekly, Community Radio Network) and Rufus On Fire (The Music Almanac, Triple H 100.1FM, Hornsby, NSW) take an in-depth look at the festival in what is its 30th year. It’s a series of great music, interviews and discussion, which will both entertain and inform listeners.
In this episode, the team chats to Aussie artist Caiti Baker who shares her family history when it comes to Bluesfest, plus we take a look at the man behind Bluesfest, festival director Peter Noble. Meanwhile, Rufus On Fire delves into the Byron Bay creative scene, plus great music from Russell Morris, Gary Clark Jr and Nathaniel Rateliff

Wednesday 10 April 

Sonic Tonic

Part 7&8 (Swinburne University)

58'00 - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Concluding the Sonic Tonic series, this edition contains the final two episodes of the 2019 series, Roderick Nathan Diaz's 'My Game Strategy' and Alex Lowes with 'The Hunt for Haggis'

The Road to Bluesfest 

Part 1 (2HHH)

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

A 3-part music documentary series, focusing on the excitement and build-up to Bluesfest 2019. Presenter Graeme Doyle (host of The Live Rock Report, Triple H 100.1FM, Hornsby, NSW), together with contributors Noddy (Aussie Music Weekly, Community Radio Network) and Rufus On Fire (The Music Almanac, Triple H 100.1FM, Hornsby, NSW) take an in-depth look at the festival in what is its 30th year. It’s a series of great music, interviews and discussion, which will both entertain and inform listeners.
In the opening episode, we speak with blues musician Shaun Kirk about his long association with Bluesfest. We also shine the spotlight on festival performer Ray La Montagne. As well we take a look at the festival within a festival, The Boomerang Festival. There’s also great music from Kurt Vile, Norah Jones, Benny Walker and Baker Boy.

Wednesday 3 April

Federal Budget Special 

(2SER)

10 x 0'41 to 06'57 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

A consortium of community radio reporters were inside the 2019 Federal Budget Lockup. From ArtSound FM in Canberra, reporters from 2SER's On The Money present detailed analysis with a specialised team of reporters. Including highlights in key areas from the Budget like Health, Mental Health, Environment, Energy and Infastructure, making for excellent on-air segments leading up to the election later this year. 

Sonic Tonic 

Part 5&6 (Swinburne University)

58'10 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Continuing in the Sonic Tonic series, this edition contains the next two episodes in the 8 part series; Anthony Pinda's 'Always on the Green' as well as Jayde Wilkinson with 'The Intolerant Intruder'.

Wednesday 27 March

Sonic Tonic 

Part 1&2 (Swinburne University)

58'10 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Over the last nine years the “Sonic Tonic” series and those that preceded it, have allowed the work of almost 70 Swinburne University students to gain exposure beyond the dusty confines of the university. This edition contains the first two episodes in the 8 part series; Cameron Pearce's 'The Apprentice’s Guide to Dungeons and Dragons' as well as Rebecca Pannell's 'Gift Giving'.

Sonic Tonic

Part 3&4 (Swinburne University)

58'10 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Continuing in the Sonic Tonic series, this edition contains the next two episodes in the 8 part series; Lidija Turkalj's 'The Racecourse to Retirement' as well as Maddison Pettit with 'Bonnie’s Story'.

Wednesday 20 March

Can you Murder a Robot? Hitchbot

(BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

The robot revolution is upon us, so is it time to consider what our relationship with machines looks like? How can we damage a robot? Back in 2015, a hitchhiker was murdered on the streets of Philadelphia. It was no ordinary crime, the hitchiker in question was a little robot called Hitchbot. The death raised interesting questions about the human-robot relationship - not so much whether we can trust robotos, but whether the robots can trust us. Dive deep into this experiement, as BBC News joined Prof Smith and Dr Zeller to take out the new Hitchbot 2.0 on one of it's first outings. 

Global Beats: Peru Djing

(BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 13:04 EDT

Meet the talented group of young DJs and producers behind Peru’s captivating tropical bass sound. Deltatron and Tribilin Sound have been mining Peru’s rich musical archives and creating new highly danceable chicha and cumbia-based tracks.Their music is proving highly popular but not just in Peru, Deltatron now spends half his time Dj-ing in clubs around the world. Their music reflects a new pride in all things Peruvian.

Mardi Gras 2019Wednesday 13 March

Mardi Gras Parade 2019

Part 1 (JOY 94.9)

54'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

If you couldn’t make it to the 2019 Mardi GrasParade, thanks to JOY 94.9, CRN is bringing stations 2 x Mardi Gras specials.

Produced by a team of 12 volunteers roadside for over 200 floats in the parade, bring listeners all the fun, floats, dancing and much more of Mardi Gras 2019.

Mardi Gras Parade 2019

Part 2 (JOY 94.9)

54'00 mins - Extras 2 at 13:04 EDT

Wednesday 6 March

Women in Wartime

(Media Heads)

10 x 90 sec to 01'45 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Women In Wartime will highlight the deeply emotional and personal experiences of Australian women affected by war, along with the many and varied roles that they’ve filled – either by choice or by necessity – including:

  • keeping the family together while their husband, father or son was overseas fighting
  • filling vital positions vacated by men, such as those in munitions factories, the Women’s Land Army, etc
  • nursing, and the role of nurses both abroad and on the home-front
  • looking after returned servicemen suffering from shell shock or PTSD

Jailbreak: IWD 2019 Special

(2SER)

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

For International Women's Day 2019, Jailbreak presents an hour-long special of the voices of women locked up - separated from their children support and family.

Wednesday 27 February

Message from the Moon

(BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

In December 1968, as the crew of Apollo 8 orbited the Moon, they read extracts from Genesis live to a global TV audience.

Astronaut Nicole Stott follows the Apollo 8 mission from launch to splashdown and we hear from astronauts giving their unique perspective on creation, faith and God. Their thoughts are interwoven with music from Hannah Peel's composition, Mary Casio: Journey to Cassiopeia.

How do we stop young people killing themselves?

(BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-29 year olds globally. But innovative and unexpected ways to tackle this public health issue are emerging.

From Nigeria to Finland, ordinary people and experts are putting their own experiences and expertise to use in coming up with ways that help prevent deaths in their communities. School timetables, video games and social media are among some of the new ways being trialled to cut deaths and break the taboo surrounding youth suicide. We ask what can be done to stop young people taking their own lives?

Wednesday 20 February

Where Are The Aliens?

(BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Vulcans, Daleks, Martians, Grays - our culture is pervaded by alien beings from distant worlds – some benevolent…most not so much. In our galaxy alone, there should be tens of billions of planets harbouring life, but we have not heard any broadcasts or seen any flashing lights from distant civilisations.

Based in Silicon Valley, California, chief astronomer for SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence), Seth Shostak, has devoted his career to searching for signs of alien life. In this programme he tackles this fundamental question about whether we are alone in the universe.

Sounds Of Space: Deep Space

(BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Some are recorded sound, others are data – like X-rays or radio waves - that have been sonified. All of them have inspired scientists and artists to help us understand our universe.

Joining Lucie Green on this sonic journey through space are:

- Prof Tim O'Brien (Associate Director of Jodrell Bank Observatory)

- Honor Harger (Executive Director of the ArtScience museum in Singapore)

- Dr Andrew Pontzen (Cosmology Research Group, University College London)

Wednesday 13 February

The Politics of Mongolian Hip-Hop

(BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

MC Dizraeli hears how Mongolia’s massive hip hop scene is shaping the country’s future.

Post-mining boom 'Minegolia' is recovering from an economic crash. Half of the 3 million population lives in the growing capital, Ulaanbaatar. Yet these young, urban Mongolians aren’t turning their backs on traditional rural values.

Dizraeli meets Mongolia’s hip hop pioneers and finds surprising lyrics that dispense moral advice, worry about alcoholism or praise the taste of fresh yoghurt on the Mongolian steppe. Freestyles and conversations across Ulaanbaatar reveal global hip hop influences and deep resonances with Mongolia’s musical heritage.

Brazil: New Musical Voices

(BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Maria Beraldo is a Brazilian singer, composer, clarinet player and LGBTQ activist. She released her first solo album, Cavala, in May 2018, to critical acclaim. For this Brazilian edition of Global Beats, Maria presents seven of her fellow musical artists, chosen for their strong voices, both musically and politically.

Wednesday 6 February

The Sun Our Star

(BBC World Service)

1 x 51'40 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

The Sun Our Star

(BBC World Service)

1 x 51'40 mins - Extras 2 at 13:04 EDT

Dava Sobel orbits the sun, getting as close as she dares, to understand the immense relationship we have with our nearest star.

The Sun, our star, the source and sustainer of all life on Earth... is also a death star in the making. To know the Sun is an age-old dream of humankind. For centuries astronomers contented themselves with analysing small sips of Sunlight collected through specialised instruments.

Wednesday 31 January

Tamworth CMF Golden Guitar Awards - Winner Interviews

(Good Morning Country)

15 x 01'00 to 04'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Interviews from Australian country music's night of nights - the 2019 Golden Guitar Awards live at the Tamworth Country Music Festival.

Good Morning Country caught up with the night's winners including Fanny Lumsden, The Wolfe Brothers, Beccy Cole and many more.

Solving Alzheimer’s

Part 3 (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Solving Alzheimer's looks at the issues caused from the disease, reporting from South Korea, Nigeria and the Netherlands.

With a rise in the number of people living into their eighties and beyond, dementia is a growing issue.

Wednesday 24 January

Our Love For Indian Classical Music

(BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Indian classical music is an art form that’s been in the making for thousands of years. Its exponential growth in the UK alone has seen a 70 percent increase in people taking exams in this form of music.

We visit the tomb of one of the original forefathers of the music, Amir Khusrao, and take to the road to experience the sights and sounds of the live concerts and festivals.

Solving Alzheimer’s

Part 2 (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Solving Alzheimer's looks at the issues caused from the disease, reporting from South Korea, Nigeria and the Netherlands.

With a rise in the number of people living into their eighties and beyond, dementia is a growing issue.

Wednesday 16 January

Are we alone in the universe? 

(BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

The Real Story asks a panel of space scientists: are we any closer to finding extra-terrestrial life?

What new approaches are showing promise?

How will we know if we've found it? And what might that life be like?

Solving Alzheimer’s

Part 1 (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Solving Alzheimer's looks at the issues caused from the disease, reporting from South Korea, Nigeria and the Netherlands.

With a rise in the number of people living into their eighties and beyond, dementia is a growing issue.

One in three - maybe even one in two - of us will get dementia and forget almost everything we ever knew. Those that don’t get the disease, have a high chance of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia.

Wednesday 9 January

Woodford Folk Festival 2018

Part 3 (4ZZZ and 4EB)

55'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Highlights from Woodford Folk Festival 2018. Hear from performers, organisers, punters and notable guests including Butterfingers, Jonathan Sri, the Woodford Children's Festival, Esther, Tenzin Nyidon, Les Poules a Colin and Anthony Albanese.

Wingham Akoostik Festival

(2BOB)

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Highlights from the Wingham Akoostik Festival, held annually in the Manning Valley of New South Wales.

Wednesday 2 January

Woodford Folk Festival 2018

Part 1 (4ZZZ and 4EB)

55'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Highlights from Woodford Folk Festival 2018. Hear from performers, organisers, punters and notable guests including Butterfingers, Jonathan Sri, the Woodford Children's Festival, Esther, Tenzin Nyidon, Les Poules a Colin and Anthony Albanese.

Woodford Folk Festival 2018

Part 2 (4ZZZ and 4EB)

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Wednesday 26 December

The Hero's Journey 

(Tribe FM)

55'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

From Star Wars to Mad Max to The Matrix and the Lion King, movie makers have for decades followed the stages identified in The Hero Journey, written by Joseph Campbell.

Join Teeya and Ros and guests as they follow Maria’s story along the stages of The Hero Journey, from The Call to Adventure, to The Meeting with the Mentor, through The Belly of the Whale and The Road of Trials, to The Supreme Ordeal and finally The Return home with the elixir that helps in some way to redeem the world.

Will you recognise these stages in your own life? Will these stages apply to your journeys and adventures?

Come along with us on The Hero Journey and find out how The Hero Journey really is a Guide to your Life.

Marysville Jazz And Blues Weekend Highlights 

Part 3 (JOY 94.9 and UGFM)

22'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Joy 94.9’s David Moyle of Bent Notes and Peter Guest of UGFM's All that Jazz review the Marysville Jazz and Blues Weekend with interviews with some of the performers and their music.

In Part 3, hear from Harley & Rose - of headline act Joe Camilleri & the Black Sorrows. Hear an interview with Trad Jazz Band Shiraz.

Wednesday 19 December

Carols by Candlelight Community RadioCarols by Candlelight 2018 Preview

Part 2 (Vision Australia)

27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Chris Thompson shines a light on the history of the Vision Australia Radio Carols by Candlelight event, now in its 82nd year.

Preview this year's even supporting blind and low-vision children whilst entertaining families Australia-wide this Christmas eve.

In Part 2, we focus on the 2018 event, hearing from the mother of one of our young clients Parker, and mum Amy Thorne shares her story. Dedicated carols fan Hala Austin shares why she’s attended the event each year since she was a toddler and performer Silvie Paladino explains why she’s again supporting this year’s event.

Marysville Jazz And Blues Weekend Highlights

Part 2 (JOY 94.9 and UGFM)

22'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Joy 94.9’s David Moyle of Bent Notes and Peter Guest of UGFM's All that Jazz review the Marysville Jazz and Blues Weekend with interviews with some of the performers and their music.

In Part 2, David and Peter discuss Admirals Own Big Band, an interview with Ben Charnley of Ben Charnley Quartet regarding a workshop and concert presented on the weekend. Plus an interview with official photographer Robyn Cuzens.  

Wednesday 12 December

Carols by Candlelight Community RadioCarols by Candlelight 2018 Preview

Part 1 (Vision Australia)

27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Chris Thompson shines a light on the history of the Vision Australia Radio Carols by Candlelight event, now in its 82nd year.

Preview this year's even supporting blind and low-vision children whilst entertaining families Australia-wide this Christmas eve.

Part 1 looks back at the history of the event.

Reflect on where it all began, hear from VA’s audio description manager Michael Ward on the service offered during the broadcast this year, learn why Vision Australia volunteer Steven Cavell has volunteered at the event for 11 years now. Also hear from Carols event coordinator Clementine Binks.

Marysville Jazz And Blues Weekend Highlights 

Part 1 (JOY 94.9 and UGFM)

22'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Joy 94.9’s David Moyle of Bent Notes and Peter Guest of UGFM's All that Jazz review the Marysville Jazz and Blues Weekend with interviews with some of the performers and their music.

In Part 1, David and Peter discuss the highlights of the weekend including interviews with Gypsy Jazz Project (Canberra) also an Interview with Bruce Rose.

Interview with the weekend’s Music Director Bill Bate, Anita Harris music track, Interview with Bev & Leigh Fraser (Eva to Diva) with in studio live performance Woodstock.

Wednesday 5 December

Global Beats: South Korea

(BBC World Service)

1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

South Korea is famous for K-pop, slick girl and boy bands with millions of fans around the world and now a multi-million dollar industry.

But South Korea also has a vibrant independent music scene, with bands playing every genre of music you can think of, and, as Global Beats discovers, increasingly seeking their own distinctly Korean sound.

Young, Cool and Kazakhstani

(BBC World Service)

1 x 49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

More than 25 years after independence, young Kazakhstanis are still trying to make sense of their dark history and their place in the new world order. At least half of the 18 million population of Kazakhstan is under 30 - born and raised in the post-Soviet era.

Russian journalist Tatyana Movshevich goes to Almaty, the cultural capital of Kazakhstan to meet young Kazakhs and find out how they are moving their country forward, how they navigate their lives under an authoritarian regime and play their part in a global world.

Wednesday 28 November

IDPWD: Chronically Chilled and Direct Action (3CR)

2 x 27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Chronically Chilled

Chronically Chilled is a show that discusses experiences and topics related to chronic illness, disability and mental health.  In this special Disability Day episode, presenter Marijo Pozega is joined by Ricky Buchanan. 

Direct Action - Worldwide Disability Protest in 2018 
Helen Gwilliam reviews just some of the protests by disability activists in the past year, including activists occupying parliaments in the UK, Poland and Nigeria and the march of empty wheelchairs in Argentina

Read more here.

International Day of People with DisabilityIDPWD: De-Stigmatised and Only Human (Radio Adelaide and 4ZZZ)

2 x 27'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

De-Stigmatised

De-Stigmatised celebrates IDPWD, hearing from three individuals striding to make a long-lasting impact in changing what we think or perceive about disabled people and their capabilities of living independently. Jarad McLoughlin and Aiden Marks look at autism/neurodiversity and expose incidents of inherent, hostile ableism involving employers and airlines.

Only Human

On this special episode of Only Human,hear from Dale Reardon (My Disability Matters); Sorry Day 2018; Holly and Chris (Help Enterprises);  Sally Balwin (Braille House); and Linda Neil (musician and writer).

Read more here.

Wednesday 21 November

4ZZZ Kim StewartIDPWD: It's The People's Radio (4ZZZ)

4 x 15'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

It’s the People’s Radio is a four-part series about the experiences of people with a disability in community radio in Australia.

Producer Kim Stewart interviewed 19 People With Disability and their supporters from around the country, as part of a Doctorate of Creative Industries at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, Queensland.

Read more here.

Steve Richardson 4RPH International Day of People with DisabilityIDPWD: Access All Areas (4RPH)

2 x 27'30, 25'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Produced by Steve Richardson of 4RPH Brisbane, Access All Areas is a monthly program which focuses on issues and events in the disability field.

In Part 1, find out about 'Tactile Tours' provided to people with impaired vision to attend plays, performances and circus, and what is being done in electronic banking to make it more accessible.

And in Part 2, Steve speaks with an artist with low-vision about a website they created, and a blind-adventurer who has recently released their autobiography.

Read more here.

Wednesday 14 November

The Greyhound Diaries (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Singer-songwriter Doug Levitt hears the stories of America’s struggling people as they ride across the country on long-haul coaches – and turns their tales into songs. For 12 years and 120,000 miles, he has crossed the United States by Greyhound, guitar on his back, and notebook in his pocket.

The people on the margins ride Greyhound, the only form of long distance travel they can afford. It makes for a singular community of people on the move, looking for work, dealing with family emergencies and taking leaps of faith in pursuit of transformation, redemption and healing.

My Madonna (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

With contributions from people Madonna lived and worked with during her formative years, this special highlights the drive and determination that took a struggling, ambitious young dancer from suburban Detroit, with grand visions of one day becoming a club dancer in New York City, on a journey that exceeded her wildest expectations as she evolved to become one of pop music’s most successful icons.

Wednesday 7 November

Through the Community Radio NetworkCentenary of Armistice Remembrance Concert - Part 1 (City Park Radio)

54'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

From Launceston’s majestic Albert Hall comes a concert to mark the Centenary of Armistice, with local and international performances encompassing choir, pipe bands, folk music and Australian Army Buglers. 

Over 200 performers will be on stage including the O’Dowds from Moe, Mick Whittle from Geelong, Dean Cocker and Mick Flannagan from Tasmania and Marian Burns from New Zealand.

Produced by Ros Elliot. Rea

d by Leo Gortz with permission from Behrouz.

Centenary of Armistice Remembrance Concert - Part 2 (City Park Radio)

54'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Wednesday 31 October

No Friend but the Mountains (TribeFM 91.1)

7 x 01'00 to 07'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Kurdish acaedemic, journalist and author Behrouz Boochani fled Iran, taking a smuggler's boat from Indonesia to Australia.

Since imprisoned on Manus Island, he secretly wrote 'No Friend But The Mountains', a powerful and poetic book over 5 years by sending out thousands of texts.

This descriptive, emotional and poetic book relates the lived experience of a crowded controlling prison with no knowledge of how long before resettled eleswhere will occur.

Download a synopsis sheet PDF iconhere.

Produced by Ros Elliot. Read by Leo Gortz with permission from Behrouz.

Global Beats: Gqom (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

Gqom, pronounced with a Zulu click at the beginning, roughly translates as the sound of a kick drum being struck. It’s also the name of a sparse, dark, hypnotic genre of electronic music.

Made in the townships of Durban, South Africa, on basic software and distributed via taxi drivers, over the last few years gqom has caught the ears of DJs and ravers in some of the coolest clubs in Berlin, New York and London.

Emily Dust, a London-based DJ who fell in love with gqom at first listen, travels to Durban to meet the artists who created it and who are taking it forward, including Naked Boys, DJ Lag, Griffit Vigo and Distruction Boyz. 

Wednesday 24 October

National Features and Documentary Series: Parts 5 & 6

2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

National Features and Documentary Series

Healthy Soils, Healthy Communities

With over 30 years experience in organic farming, Barry Green is involved in something called the New Food Movement.

In Healthy Soils, Healthy Communities he hears from a group of Australians concerned about the future of food, and the solution they’re putting on the table.

Produced by Barry Green of Donnybrook Community Radio. Supervising production by Ian Hill.

National Features and Documentary SeriesAt The Coalface

The story of a billboard, a coal mine, and a rural community split in two.

Nikola Van de Wetering returns to her hometown to dig-up the controversy sitting close to the surface in At The Coalface.

Produced by Nikola Van de Wetering of 4ZZZ, Brisbane. Supervising production by Stephen Stockwell.

National Features and Documentary Series: Parts 7 & 8

2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

National Features and Documentary SeriesHidden Carers

A quarter of a million Australians care for family members living with mental health difficulties.

In Hidden Carers, Meredith Gilmore sits down with Anne and Robyn to find out what their lives and challenges look like.

Produced by Meredith Gilmore of Coast FM 963. Supervising production by Ian Crouch.

Finding Voice

For asylum seekers who are writers, poets, and journalists, finding a voice in their new home can be a significant challenge.

In Finding Voice, Bangladeshi poet and journalist Humayun Reza speaks about the challenges some writers face in Australia. 

Produced by Mick Paddon and Humayun Reza of Eastside Radio. Supervising production by Sharon Davis.

Wednesday 17 October

National Features and Documentary Series: Parts 1 & 2

2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

National Features and Documentary Series

The Runners' Guide

For many of us, a quick jog is our preferred form of exercise. But what if you need to overcome additional barriers in order to get up and running? Tie up your laces and join Katharina Loesche as she meets a couple of joggers in The Runners’ Guide.

Produced by Katharina Loesche of Radio 4EB, Brisbane. Supervising production by Kim Stewart.

National Features and Documentary Series

To Say I Am Home

A story of what we talk about when we talk about home. What is it like to leave the one home you’ve ever really known? In To Say I Am Home, Mahendra Chitrarasu tells the story of his grandmother’s migration to Australia.

Produced by Mahendra Chitrarasu of Radio Adelaide. Supervising production by Nikki Marcel.

National Features and Documentary Series: Parts 3 & 4

2 x 25'50 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

National Features and Documentary Series

Hear Our Voices

How is Australia experienced by the South Sudanese youth growing up here? Aguer Athian brings us some of their stories to change the current narrative, and give voice to the voiceless in Hear Our Voices. 

Produced by Aguer Athian of 3ZZZ, Melbourne. Supervising production by Maddy Macfarlane.

The Shooting Gallery

National Features and Documentary SeriesWhen it comes to drugs, we are often handed the line that it's best to be 'tough'. But there’s at least one community taking another approach. Aoife Cooke takes us to what’s formally known as a “medically supervised injecting centre", but is known to some as The Shooting Gallery.

Produced by Aoife Cooke of 3CR, Melbourne. Supervising production by Georgia Moodie.

Wednesday 10 October

On The Road: Memphis (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EDT

Renowned pianist Jools Holland drives from Clarksdale to Memphis replicating the journey which so many musicians have made before him.

Once in the Bluff City- arguably the most important music town in the world – he visits the project housing where Elvis Presley lived as a teenager and where he first played in public and goes to Aretha Franklin’s birthplace, situated in an area of tremendous urban deprivation which is gaining a new life through music.

Africa's Big Philanthropy: Health (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EDT

In 2016 The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation pledged to invest five billion dollars in poverty reduction and health in Africa. Other big givers like the Rockefeller Foundation have spent billions on health, agriculture and livelihood programmes. Some say governments and global agencies have come to depend on the donations of big philanthropic donors for their programmes, but how much influence do they have, and with the rise of home-grown African wealth what is the future is for philanthropy here?

Wednesday 3 October

Breaking The Seal (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Whatever is said in the confessional stays in the confessional; it is a sacred, unyielding law throughout Catholicism, but in Australia it's now being challenged.

In certain states laws are being introduced so priests can now be fined if they are found to have withheld information from the confessions of child abusers. Priests across the country have said they won’t adhere to the law, saying it breaks a sacred trust.

The Children of Belsen (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

In April 1945 a 15-year-old Dutch Jewish girl was interviewed by the BBC in the Nazi concentration camp of Bergen-Belsen shortly after its liberation by the British.

Weakened by typhoid, Hetty Werkendam, now known as Hetty Verolme, described to reporter Patrick Gordon Walker some of the horrific conditions in the Nazi camp where more than 50,000 prisoners died. She also told him how she and her younger brothers were separated from their parents, and how they lived for the last months of the war in a separate barracks with other Jewish children, largely ignored by the SS authorities.

Wednesday 26 September

Model X (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

In Paris, aspiring models have to adjust to rather spartan conditions - from sharing a flat with strangers to moving around an unknown city all alone and surviving on a mere 80 euros a week.

Despite their bestefforts to get a job, most of the girls will leave Paris with empty pockets.

Former model and now BBC journalist, Alina Isachenka, follows 17-year-old schoolgirl Anna Vasileva from the city of Nizhny Novgorod in Russia on her challenging journey through tough competition and over-demanding casting directors to the top of the fashion industry.

On The Road: Nashville (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Join renowned pianist Jools Holland as he flies to Nashville to visit RCA Studio A. In the 1950s and early 60s under the leadership of Chet Atkins, Studio A was the place where modern day country music was invented.

In the cavernous room meet Dave Cobb and the man they call the soul of Nashville, musician & historian Marty Stuart, and some of the new young stars attracted to the city like the band Midland & Australian actress and singer Clare Bowen, star of the TV series “Nashville”.

Wednesday 19 September

The Changing Face of Procreation - Part 2 (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Krupa Padhy meets the scientists at the cutting edge of reproductive medicine and examines the alternative paths being taken to create families. In part two, Krupa looks to what comes next.

She meets the doctor using IVF technology to reverse menopause. In England she visits a family of the future, made up of white British parents and their three boys plus a ‘snow baby’, created during an IVF cycle for her Indian-American genetic parents but adopted as an embryo by her birth family. 

Iceland: What Happened Next? (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Iceland is a small island nation of just 340,000 people but at the height of the global financial crisis in 2008 it was the scene of one of the biggest banking collapses in history.

Ten years on the economy has recovered, thanks to the millions of tourists who now visit every year. But what scars have been left on this close-knit island nation’s collective psyche? 

Wednesday 12 September

The Changing Face of Procreation - Part 1 (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

By the end of the century, an estimated 157 million people alive or 1.4 % of the world’s population will owe their lives to assisted reproductive technologies like IVF, donor eggs and sperm and surrogacy.

So how are people around the world using these innovations? And how well is society doing in getting to grips with the ethical questions that go hand in hand with the creation of life of in these ways? 

Falling (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

A construction worker dies and, instinctively, we blame him. Why wasn’t he wearing his safety belt? But what if we are wrong?

What if all of us – families, colleagues, companies and society as a whole – have been failing workers who have lost their lives or been injured at work, all over the world?

Wednesday 5 September

Putting Your Money Where Your Mouth Is (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

What do our teeth say about us?

BBC Journalist Natalia Guerrero travels to Miami and LA and asks, do we judge others by their teeth and do we demonstrate our own wealth by paying for the perfect smile?

This documentary explores what our teeth say about us.

The Life and Times of Senator John McCain (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Few American politicians have carved such a distinctive career as the late John McCain, the Republican Senator for Arizona.

Anthony Zurcher, the BBC's North America reporter, looks back at his life, including his military service, during which he endured five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam, and his two unsuccessful bids for the American presidency.

He also examines how McCain gained a reputation as a political maverick, and inflicted one of the most high-profile policy defeats of Donald Trump's presidency to date.

Wednesday 29 August

The Benefits of Nakedness (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Some people just love to be naked in public. Dr. Keon West travels far and wide to speak to those who enjoy taking their clothes off to find out why they do it, and what the benefits – and disadvantages – might be.

Dr. West is a social psychologist at Goldsmiths, University of London, and has done some research into naturist groups in the UK.

His work showed that those of us who are naked in public are more likely to be happier not just with our bodies, but also with our lives more generally. 

Aretha Franklin: Queen Of Soul (BBC World Service)

26'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Aretha Franklin, for fifty years the Queen of Soul, with a voice of unique quality and who suffered a difficult and troubled life, has died at the age of 76.

Jumoke Fashola hears from musicians, fans and producers from different parts of the world about what made Aretha Franklin’s music special.

It Includes contributions from South African singer Lira, American musician Valerie June, record company mogul Clive Davis, producer Narada Michael Walden, singer Sarah Dash and music journalist David Nathan.

Wednesday 23 August

Step Away From The Car (Radio Adelaide)

10 x 05'00 to 07'00 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Over a 10-part series of short pieces ready to drop into your radio programs, Step Away from the Car hears from a variety of thinkers who were present at the 2017 Australian Walking and Cycling Conference.

The conference and pieces get listeners thinking about using more 'active' choices when it comes to transport, choices that require stepping away from the car. 

Producer: Nikki Page, Radio Adelaide

Global Beats: Heavy Metal in Finland (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Heavy-metal music, with its distorted guitar sounds, emphatic rhythms and dense bass and drum is incredibly popular in Nordic countries. In Finland there are more heavy-metal musicians per capita than in any other nation on Earth, and the country seems to have a real love affair with this genre of music.

Finnish presenter Ida Kiljander takes us to Tuska, one of her country’s biggest metal festivals, to meet bands including Finland’s Moonsorrow, Sweden’s Bombus and the headlining French band Gojira.

Wednesday 15 August

National Indigenous Music Awards 2018 (TEABBA)

55'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

55'50 mins - Extras 2 at 13:04 EST

On Saturday the Darwin Ampitheatre came alive for the 2018 NIMAs.

Catch performances from many award winners, finalists and hall-of-famers including Baker Boy, Busby Marou, Kasey Chambers, the Central Australian Aboriginal Women's Choir, Roger Knox and Alice Skye (pictured).

Wednesday 8 August

Communities in Control: Part 3 of 3 (SYN Media and Our Community)

27'50 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

Hear from some of Australia’s prominent public figures and community groups who lent their voices to the 2018 Communities in Control Conference, hosted by Our Community.

What does it take to combat inequality from the community level? What impacts are mental health issues and social fragmentation having on Australia as a society? How does difference act as a barrier for social integration? 

Hear Stan Grant and Hugh Mackay, plus Ann Burbrook from Illawarra Multicultural Services share their thoughts and insights. 

Producer: Caroline Tung

Winning It Big (BBC World Service)

26'30 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Most people have dreamed of winning the lottery. It’s a dream that has become ever more common around the world as jackpots get bigger and lotteries more numerous. But does money really make us happy, and how much does this depend on where we live and how we spend it?

To find out, the BBC’s Mike Thomson meets lottery winners from around the globe. Mike dines with Arab/Israeli restaurateur, Jawdat Ibrahim, who spends much of his $23 million windfall on trying to bring Palestinians and Israelis closer together, through good food and dialogue.

Wednesday 1 August

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 5 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode Five: Fatal Attraction

Historian Margaret MacMillan looks at representations of war: can we really create beauty from horror and death? Speaking at the Canadian War Museum, she discusses the paradox of commemoration. She questions attempts to capture the essence and meaning of war through art. The programme is presented by Anita Anand in front of an audience and includes a question and answer session.

Global Beats: New Labels (BBC World Service)

49'30 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

When the internet exploded onto the scene, it blew apart the way the music industry worked. Recording artists were no longer dependent on winning the attention of a record label. They could reach millions ofpotential fans all around the world direct.

For a moment it looked as if record labels were on a downward slide, but as it turns out this was wrong. And for new labels that's been very good news, judging from their ever increasing number. Some are dedicated to a particular genre or the music of a particular country, for example Tiger’s Milk, which is on a mission to make Peruvian grooves old and new available to a global audience.

Wednesday 25 July

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 4 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode Four: Managing the Unmanageable

Historian Margaret MacMillan assesses how the law and international agreements have attempted to address conflict. Speaking to an audience at the Northern Irish Parliament Buildings at Stormont in Belfast, Professor MacMillan outlines how both states and the people have sought to justify warfare - from self-defence to civil war - focusing on examples from Irish and British history. 

Skateboarding is 60 (BBC World Service)

49'30 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

Sixty years ago, a man wandered into a surf shop on the beach in Southern California with a homemade wooden board with four roller-skate wheels attached. An insignificant beginning for a culture that would eventually influence communities all around the world.

You might see the skateboard as just a toy, but in 60 years, the people who skate have created a culture that has had a profound influence across business, art, architecture, education and gender equality.

Wednesday 18 July

2018 Reith Lectures: Part 3 of 5 (BBC World Service)

49'30 mins - Extras 1 at 13:04 EST

The 2018 Reith Lectures with Margaret MacMillan: is war an essential part of being human?

The lectures are recorded in front of an audience and have a question and answer session. They are chaired by journalist and historian Anita Anand.

Episode Three: Civilians and War

Historian Margaret MacMillan dissects the relationship between war and the civilian. Speaking to an audience in Beirut, she looks back at the city's violent past and discusses the impact of conflict on noncombatants throughout the centuries.

She explores how civilians have been deliberately targeted, used as slaves and why women are still often singled out in mass rapes. And she addresses the proposition that human beings are becoming less, not more violent. The programme is chaired by Anita Anand.

Beyond The Bars 2018: Part 2 of 2 (3CR)

55'50 - Extras 2 at 14:04 EST

On the air since 2002, Beyond the Bars in 2018 features stories, songs, opinions and poems from over 100 men and women in the Dame Phyllis Frost Centre, Barwon Prison, Fulham Correctional Centre, Marngoneet Correctional Centre, Loddon Prison and Port Phillip Prison. 

The all-black radio broadcast team present the broadcasts and workshops in the lead up to NAIDOC Week.

Find out how to access these and other CRN programs for your station

 

George Orwell's 1984

George Orwell's 1984

A century later we are still questioning our ability to come together.

women walking

Step Away from the Car is a series of 10 segments that get listeners thinking about using more 'active' choices when it comes to transport, choices that require us stepping away from the car.  

Applications for National Features and Documentary Series 2020 are now open!

Hitsville USA - Motown Headquarters

Look back at one of the most iconic times in music history over 8 parts.

History Lab Logo

History Lab has some good stories to tell, but it's not interested in just telling you these stories, or what to think. History Lab wants to draw you in to the investigative process, and challenge you to think of when, what and why history happens. 

New Beginnings Logo

New Beginnings, is a twelve-part, six-hour long-form community radio documentary that explores the personal stories of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees in Canberra and Australia.

Baby Boomers' Guide

Healthy ageing, especially for Australians aged 55 and over.

Mike Goodwin - Live in the Room

Join Mike Goodwin for an intimate performance and chat with local Western Australian artists. 

Little Fictions
Little Fictions, is a half-hour storytelling program presented by Sydney actor, Ella Watson-Russell, and produced and orginally broadcast on Sydney's 2RPH. The show features contemporary short stories by authors from across Australia and read by actors, recorded at live performances or in studio. 

A 10-part series of strong voices from Pacific islands and the Torres Strait fighting for climate justice and survival.

CRN Segments Series

Flex your creative thinking, develop production skills, and share radio content on a national platform.

Community Radio Network Program Guide

A guide to the programs currently being broadcast/distributed via the CBAA's Community Radio Network (CRN) to community radio stations all over Australia.