Community Broadcasting Suicide Prevention Project - March 2015

Danny Chifley, 16th March 2015
Print

The Community Broadcasting Association is pleased to welcome you to the March 2015 content of our national suicide prevention and mental health awareness project, developed with the support of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing.

Each month, our project team develops a series of 20 short radio segments designed to promote help-seeking behaviour and positive lifestyle choices, using interviews with service providers, as well as profiles of people who have successfully dealt with tough times in their lives.

This month we meet Sam Clarke, an inspirational young man who was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 13 and who is now a youth ambassador for R U OK?

We get some advice for Year 12 students on how to navigate what is usually the most challenging year of their school lives. We learn about an app that has been developed to help women manage the stress of pregnancy and reduce the risk of developing postnatal depression, and we hear about a new music video that has been developed to encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to talk about mental health and wellbeing.

For more information on this project, please contact the Community Broadcasting Association of Australia on (02) 9310 2999, or email: iwatson@cbaa.org.au

 

 

Topic

1

We hear about a new music video that has been developed by headspace to encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to talk about mental health and wellbeing.

DUR: 2:27

2

We learn about the Mind the Bump app, which has been developed to help women manage the stress of pregnancy and reduce the risk of developing postnatal depression.

DUR: 1:51

3

beyondblue provides some advice for Year 12 students on how to navigate what is usually the most challenging year of their school lives.

DUR: 2:26

4

We chat with Sam Clarke, an inspirational young man who was diagnosed with cancer at the age of 13 and who is now a youth ambassador for R U OK?

DUR: 2:03

5

SANE Australia’s Suicide Prevention Manager Sarah Coker tells us stigma can be a major problem encountered by people who have attempted suicide when trying to access the support and help they need.

DUR: 2:10

6

We learn about QLife, Australia’s first nationally-oriented counselling and referral service for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex people.

DUR: 1:25

7

We caught up with Chez Curnow from the Standby Response Service, and ask why local community-driven responses are so important following a suicide.

DUR: 2:03

8

We learn about some tools, tips, videos and fact sheets beyondbluehas developed to help us to begin conversations about mental health.

DUR: 2:00

9

We catch up with Lifeline CEO Jane Hayden, who says people can contact their helpline or online services about a range of issues, and don’t have to be in crisis to seek some help.

DUR: 1:41

10

We hear more about the Mind the Bump app, which has been developed to help women manage the stress of pregnancy and reduce the risk of developing postnatal depression.

DUR: 1:50

11

We profile the Partners in Depression program, an initiative of the Hunter Institute which was developed to help support people who live with, love or care for someone experiencing depression.

DUR: 1:54

12

We learn about the SANE Helpline, which provides information about mental illness symptoms, treatments, medications, where to go for support, and help for carers.

DUR: 2:12

13

beyondblue director Professor Brett McDermott tells us some of the things students in their final years of school can do to help get them through the coming months.

DUR: 2:38

14

SANE Australia’s Suicide Prevention Manager, Sarah Coker, tells us that open and honest conversations can often be important in ensuring people who have attempted suicide access the professional help they need.

DUR: 1:47

15

We hear more about a new music video that has been developed by headspace to encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people to talk about mental health and wellbeing.

DUR: 1:38

16

R U OK? youth ambassador Sam Clarke tells us people who are coping with physical or personal pain can find support and solace by finding people to speak with about how they’re feeling.

DUR: 2:05

17

ReachOut CEO Jono Nicholas tells us how ReachOut.com supports young people who prefer to access information and support online, including those living in rural and remote parts of Australia.

DUR: 2:00

18

Chez Curnow from the Standby Response Service gives us an example of the work they’re doing to promote community-lead responses to suicide in South Australia.

DUR: 1:58

19

We hear more about the Mind the Bump app, which has been developed to help women manage the stress of pregnancy and reduce the risk of developing postnatal depression.

DUR: 1:54

20

We learn about It Gets Better Australia, an inspirational project that aims to remind teenagers who are being bullied or discriminated against that they’re not alone, and that their lives will get better.

DUR: 1:55

Facebook comments

Related

Article

The Community Broadcasting Association is pleased to welcome you to the April 2015 content of our national suicide prevention and mental health awareness project, developed with the support of the

Article

The Community Broadcasting Association is pleased to welcome you to the August 2014 content of our national suicide prevention and mental health awareness project, developed with the support of the

Article

The Community Broadcasting Association is pleased to welcome you to the September 2015 content of our national suicide prevention and mental health awareness project, developed with the support of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing.