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World Suicide Prevention Day - working together to prevent suicide

Katrina Hughes, 10th September 2019
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Today (10 September 2019) marks World Suicide Prevention Day across the globe.

World Suicide Prevention Day provides a unique opportunity to collectively shine a light on suicide prevention both politically and at a community level.

Harnessing this momentum is critical to ensure productive and meaningful solutions are put in place to drive suicide rates down.

Suicide Prevention Australia CEO, Nieves Murray said, “Never before have we seen so much political attention focused on suicide prevention. Governments at a state and national level are focused and some are now calling suicide prevention a priority.

It is a national tragedy that we lose so many people to suicide. We can all make a difference in the lives of those who might be struggling by having regular, meaningful conversations about life's ups and downs. Working together to prevent suicide, raise awareness and encourage conversations is important,” said Ms Murray.

Everyone has a role to play in preventing suicide. Choices we make today can help prevent suicide.

Suicide prevention remains a universal challenge. Every year, suicide is among the top 20 leading causes of death globally for people of all ages. 

Some conversations can be too big for friends and family. If you’re worried about someone and feel they need professional support, encourage them to connect with a trusted health professional like their GP.

Suicide is a prominent community concern in Australia with the ABS reporting 3,128 deaths by suicide in 2017. Globally, it is responsible for over 800,000 deaths.

The recently released report titled Psychosocial risk factors for coroner-referred deaths in Australia also identified problems in relationships and economic circumstances as key factors when it came to suicidality. This means that we have to start looking at suicide as more than a mental health issue.

“We believe that through collaborative effort and shared purpose, we can achieve our shared vision of a world without suicide,” said Ms Murray.

World Suicide Prevention Day is organised by the International Association for Suicide Prevention (IASP).

 

Helpful resources
  • Learn how to identify the signs that someone may be struggling on the R U OK? website.
  • For pointers on how to start safe conversations around suicide check the #YouCanTalk campaign here.
  • To get help 24/7, phone Lifeline on 13 11 14 or the Suicide Call Back Service on 1300 659 467.
  • Help to report about suicide safely is available online: Go to www.mindframe.org.au

 

CBAA's national suicide prevention and mental health awareness project, Community Broadcasting Suicide Prevention Project, developed with the support of the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing is a series of 20 short radio segments designed to promote help-seeking behaviour and positive lifestyle choices, using interviews with service providers, as well as profiles of people who have successfully dealt with tough times in their lives. September content can be accessed here.

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