Now live! The CBAA National Features and Documentary Series 2019

Katrina Hughes, 19th November 2019
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Now available to listen online and broadcasting on Australian community radio stations is the sixth instalment of CBAA’s National Features and Documentary Series, an annual showcase of new work by Australian community radio producers.

With training and mentoring provided by the Community Media Training Organisation (CMTO) eight producers based at community stations coast to coast, city to bush turned their idea into an original half-hour feature for a national audience throughout 2019.

“When I first heard that my story was selected to be a part of the National Features and Documentary Series 2019, I was over the moon and went back to the drawing board”, exclaimed Bernard Namok Junior, producer of Let it Fly: The Namok’s Legacy.

Through these eight new features, hear community stories of cultural legacy, Indigenous voices on drought and water management, a women’s place in a traditional country association, descriptors of Australia’s stunning landscape from the ocean to the desert, first-hand accounts of life with a disability and so much more.

2019 documentaries include:

The series is produced for and available free for airplay on Australian community broadcasters. Discover all and previous year’s series from the National Features and Documentary Series web page, through iTunes and your favourite podcast app or platform.

The CBAA National Features and Documentary Series continues to be produced with the assistance of the Department of Communications and the Arts via the Community Broadcasting Foundation (CBF).

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