No Trickery, No Re-takes, No Stand-ins

Andrew McLellan, 12th September 2017
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Since 1995 Brisbane's Vulcana Women's Circus has worked with women to build and strengthen community networks across Brisbane. 

Despite being at the forefront of contemporary non-traditional circus in Australia since then, the Circus lost core government funding in 2012. Following their story over three-parts in No Trickery, No Re-takes, No Stand-ins4ZZZ's Craig Garrett explores how Vulcana survived that first hit, and looks nationally at the impact consecutive funding cuts since 2013 have had on our national Arts Sector. 

While looking at the circus' history, Craig asks questions of the resilience of arts organisations. What does it mean to be protected from the kinds of cuts the Australian arts have seen over the last few years?

Check out the series' website here and download the cue sheet.

This feature was produced as part of Out of the Box, a collaboration between 2SER and the CMTO with financial assistance from the Community Broadcasting Foundation.

Photos by Jen Dainer.

For CRN subscribers:

  • Distributed 30 August 2017 and captured to DDN stations ordering Extras 1
  • Alternative download options available
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Abstract
Australian queer (GLBTIQ) university student activist media is an important site of self-representation. Community media is a significant site for the development of queer identity, community and a key part of queer politics. This paper reviews my research into queer student media, which is grounded in a queer theoretical perspective. Rob Cover argues that queer theoretical approaches that study media products fail to consider the material contexts that contribute to their construction. I use an ethnographic approach to examine how editors construct queer identity and community in queer student media. My research contributes to queer media scholarship by addressing the gap that Cover identifies, and to the rich scholarship on negotiations of queer community.